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How to Spot Tonights Halloween Blue Moon & A Few Planets, Too

Illustration for article titled How to Spot Tonights Halloween Blue Moon  A Few Planets, Too

Photo: Chockdee Permploysiri (Shutterstock)

This year, trick-or-treating probably doesn’t look like you thought it would, and Halloween parties are (hopefully, in the name of public health) cancelled, but there’s still something pretty spectacular going on tonight. Best of all, it’s free and you can probably see it from your own backyard (or fire escape). Not only is there a rare Blue Moon tonight, but there’s also the possibility of spotting Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus. Here’s where and when to find them.

Where and when to find the moon and planets

First things first: the moon will not actually be blue. But, for a brief period—as it rises above the eastern horizon—it will be orange, which is even more appropriate given the holiday. So when exactly will that happen? It depends on where you live, but you can check on that here. In New York City, for example, moonrise will be at 6:13 pm tonight.

According to Jamie Carter at Forbes, here’s where to look:

Look east as the Sun sets in the west. In practice you won’t see the full Moon appear until about 10-15 minutes after the moonrise time because of atmospheric cloud low on the horizon and other obstructions.

What about those planets? Mars will be in the southeast sky, where it’ll be the brightest thing up there, after the moon. Next up: Saturn and Jupiter. “They’ll be the two bright dots dancing next to each other to the west,” Nicholas St. Fleur writes for the New York Times. “Jupiter will outshine its ringed cousin and be the brightest non-moon object on this half of the sky.” Plus, if you’re able to get up before sunrise on Sunday morning, you’ll also be able to see Venus and possibly Mercury below it.

And finally, there’s Uranus. You’re going to need a telescope for this one, and the planet will look like a small blue-green disc. Here’s where to find it, courtesy of Michele Debczak at Mental Floss:

Spotting Uranus at opposition will be slightly more difficult in 2020 than in years past. The phenomenon coincides with a full moon that will make dimmer stars and planets—including Uranus—harder to see in the night sky. The planet sits in the constellation Aries, which regrettably appears close to the moon for most of the night.

Fingers crossed for clear skies!

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New Study Reveals SARS-CoV-2 Can Invade The Brain Through The Nose – ScienceAlert

A systematic analysis of 33 COVID-19 autopsies has found small traces of viral material in the human brain, and they appear to have come from the nose.

It’s a scary thought that SARS-CoV-2 might actually make its way into the human nervous system; while the results are preliminary, the signs are not looking good. 

 

The upper part of the human nasal cavity, known as the nasopharynx, is thought to be one of the first sites of infection and replication for SARS-CoV-2, and it might also be a weak point in our brain’s defences.

The human brain is separated from the rest of the body’s blood supply by a semipermeable barrier of cells – helpfully named the blood-brain barrier – that keeps toxins and pathogens away from our precious noggins, at least most of the time. 

Some viruses, including a couple of coronaviruses, are especially sneaky and capable of slipping past this barrier. Unfortunately, SARS-CoV-2 might be one of them.

In fact, some scientists think this could be what’s causing many of the neurological symptoms associated with COVID-19, including loss of smell and taste, headaches, dizziness, nausea, and fatigue.

Recently, some studies have actually discovered traces of viral RNA in the brain and spinal fluid of some COVID-19 patients. Exactly how those remnants got there is another matter.

Some initial studies suggest the spiky proteins on the outside of SARS-CoV-2 promote inflammation in the endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier, loosening connections and letting the virus leak through. 

 

The new analysis adds another possible route. Not only did researchers find intact viral particles within the endothelial cells of the nasopharynx, they also found viral RNA in the upper part of the nose – known as the mucous membrane – as well as several regions of the brain.

The leftover genetic material was minimal, but that might have been because the autopsy took place a month after death on average.

While it might not be possible to see how the virus travels inside individual brain cells, in some patients the same spike proteins found on the outside of SARS-CoV-2 were also found in cells the researchers identified as neurons.

This suggests the SARS-CoV-2 virus may somehow be hitching a ride past the blood-brain barrier and into the brain via the long, threadlike projections of olfactory nerves.

But even if it turns out that neurons in the nose are transporting SARS-CoV-2 to the brain, in all likelihood, that’s probably just one port of entry. In the analysis, some brain regions with traces of RNA held no direct connection to the olfactory mucosa and were more involved with respiration and cardiovascular control, which suggests the virus is entering through another means as well.

It might, for instance, be leaking through the endothelial cells, as other studies suggest, or it could be hitching a ride on another cell that is allowed to cross the blood-brain barrier, for example, for carrying vital resources.

For now, we just don’t know. Accumulating reports and results suggest the virus is somehow getting through and impacting the nervous system. Time and research will hopefully reveal more, helping us to battle this unprecedented virus.

The study was published in Nature Neuroscience

 

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4 more Colorado inmates die of COVID-19 over the last week – 9News.com KUSA

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How to Spot Tonights Halloween Blue Moon & A Few Planets, Too

Illustration for article titled How to Spot Tonights Halloween Blue Moon  A Few Planets, Too

Photo: Chockdee Permploysiri (Shutterstock)

This year, trick-or-treating probably doesn’t look like you thought it would, and Halloween parties are (hopefully, in the name of public health) cancelled, but there’s still something pretty spectacular going on tonight. Best of all, it’s free and you can probably see it from your own backyard (or fire escape). Not only is there a rare Blue Moon tonight, but there’s also the possibility of spotting Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus. Here’s where and when to find them.

Where and when to find the moon and planets

First things first: the moon will not actually be blue. But, for a brief period—as it rises above the eastern horizon—it will be orange, which is even more appropriate given the holiday. So when exactly will that happen? It depends on where you live, but you can check on that here. In New York City, for example, moonrise will be at 6:13 pm tonight.

According to Jamie Carter at Forbes, here’s where to look:

Look east as the Sun sets in the west. In practice you won’t see the full Moon appear until about 10-15 minutes after the moonrise time because of atmospheric cloud low on the horizon and other obstructions.

What about those planets? Mars will be in the southeast sky, where it’ll be the brightest thing up there, after the moon. Next up: Saturn and Jupiter. “They’ll be the two bright dots dancing next to each other to the west,” Nicholas St. Fleur writes for the New York Times. “Jupiter will outshine its ringed cousin and be the brightest non-moon object on this half of the sky.” Plus, if you’re able to get up before sunrise on Sunday morning, you’ll also be able to see Venus and possibly Mercury below it.

And finally, there’s Uranus. You’re going to need a telescope for this one, and the planet will look like a small blue-green disc. Here’s where to find it, courtesy of Michele Debczak at Mental Floss:

Spotting Uranus at opposition will be slightly more difficult in 2020 than in years past. The phenomenon coincides with a full moon that will make dimmer stars and planets—including Uranus—harder to see in the night sky. The planet sits in the constellation Aries, which regrettably appears close to the moon for most of the night.

Fingers crossed for clear skies!

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How to Spot Tonights Halloween Blue Moon & A Few Planets, Too

Illustration for article titled How to Spot Tonights Halloween Blue Moon  A Few Planets, Too

Photo: Chockdee Permploysiri (Shutterstock)

This year, trick-or-treating probably doesn’t look like you thought it would, and Halloween parties are (hopefully, in the name of public health) cancelled, but there’s still something pretty spectacular going on tonight. Best of all, it’s free and you can probably see it from your own backyard (or fire escape). Not only is there a rare Blue Moon tonight, but there’s also the possibility of spotting Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus. Here’s where and when to find them.

Where and when to find the moon and planets

First things first: the moon will not actually be blue. But, for a brief period—as it rises above the eastern horizon—it will be orange, which is even more appropriate given the holiday. So when exactly will that happen? It depends on where you live, but you can check on that here. In New York City, for example, moonrise will be at 6:13 pm tonight.

According to Jamie Carter at Forbes, here’s where to look:

Look east as the Sun sets in the west. In practice you won’t see the full Moon appear until about 10-15 minutes after the moonrise time because of atmospheric cloud low on the horizon and other obstructions.

What about those planets? Mars will be in the southeast sky, where it’ll be the brightest thing up there, after the moon. Next up: Saturn and Jupiter. “They’ll be the two bright dots dancing next to each other to the west,” Nicholas St. Fleur writes for the New York Times. “Jupiter will outshine its ringed cousin and be the brightest non-moon object on this half of the sky.” Plus, if you’re able to get up before sunrise on Sunday morning, you’ll also be able to see Venus and possibly Mercury below it.

And finally, there’s Uranus. You’re going to need a telescope for this one, and the planet will look like a small blue-green disc. Here’s where to find it, courtesy of Michele Debczak at Mental Floss:

Spotting Uranus at opposition will be slightly more difficult in 2020 than in years past. The phenomenon coincides with a full moon that will make dimmer stars and planets—including Uranus—harder to see in the night sky. The planet sits in the constellation Aries, which regrettably appears close to the moon for most of the night.

Fingers crossed for clear skies!

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Heres why Denmark culled 17 million minks and now plans to dig up their buried bodies. The Covid mink crisis, explained – NBC News

Around the world, minks are getting sick.

The small, ferret-like mammals farmed for their valuable fur have raised alarm after contracting and mutating the coronavirus, passing it back to humans.

The virus, officials said, spread from human handler to mink, mutated, and then spread back to humans.

Denmark went so far as to cull 17 million minks in November in response to outbreaks at more than 200 mink farms. The northern region of the country, where most fur farms lie, was placed under strict lockdowns.

The Danish government spared no mink, killing infected and healthy animals, alike.

“We would rather go a step too far than take a step too little to combat Covid-19,” the country’s foreign minister Jeppe Kofod said at a press conference in early November. The country’s prime minister later apologized and its food and agriculture minister stepped down when the order to kill the animals was declared illegal.

The story, however, has not ended there.

Since the mass slaughter, hundreds of mink carcasses have emerged from their graves.

Buried in shallow pits and trenches in Western Denmark, the dead minks were pushed out of the ground by gas emitted from their decomposing bodies, leading to more outrage and concern.

And across the Atlantic, mink farms in the U.S. are seeing Covid-19 spread and deaths of their own.

Here’s what’s going on.

Mink are seen at the farm of Henrik Nordgaard Hansen and Ann-Mona Kulsoe Larsen near Naestved, Denmark on Nov. 6, 2020.Mads Claus Rasmussen / Ritzau Scanpix via Reuters file

Why are minks getting Covid-19 in the first place?

We know Covid-19 came from an animal host, and spilled into humans recently, said Jonathan Runstadler, professor in the department of infectious disease and global health at the Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. “That would lead one to think that the virus has retained the capability of replication and infection in other animal hosts as well.”

Runstadler, who studies emerging diseases in animals, said the outbreak in minks hasn’t surprised many in his field, in part because of the conditions in which they live.

At fur farms, minks are densely packed in conditions ripe for close contact with one another. Those conditions might be ideal for shoving the small mammals into metal machines that skin them for fancy coats and hats, but they also can be breeding grounds for the coronavirus.

Runstadler said it’s hard to know if minks are unique among other species in their ability to contract and spread the virus, or if they’re just in a situation that leads to such outbreaks.

What is known, though, Ontario Veterinary College professor Scott Weese said, is that viruses don’t automatically work their way into cells. They need to stick onto something.

“We have viruses that are just human viruses or dog viruses or cat viruses,” he explained. “This virus attaches well to mink. It’s a very good match.”

It also attaches pretty well to cats, but not as well to dogs and cows, he said. Still, we don’t know much about how it works in minks or other animals, in part because scientists have been busy trying to figure out how Covid-19 affects humans. But we do know a few things that are raising eyebrows.

Minks that catch Covid-19 are sometimes spreading a mutated form of the virus back to humans.

“Transmission back to people is more a concern at a personal level,” Weese said. “Big picture, it’s not probably a big deal because few people have contact with minks.”

When outbreaks occur at farms, local health departments are mandating quarantines. In northern Wisconsin, two farms in Taylor County are currently under quarantine after recent outbreaks killed 5,500 minks. The animals can’t move on or off the farm, said Kevin Hoffman, the public information officer for Wisconsin’s Division of Animal Health.

Hoffman said the outbreaks are under control. His department is helping the farms compost the mink bodies, and there are currently no conversations in the state about mass culling.

Still, “we’re definitely concerned,” Hoffman said, adding farmers are recommended to interact with mink the way they would humans during a pandemic: wearing proper PPE and keeping their distance.

There is also some worry that a mutated form of the virus, given to humans by minks, could make it more difficult to implement an effective vaccine.

“There is still some debate over whether it’s a relevant change, and there’s not a clear answer on that,” Weese said.

It’s why both Weese and Runstadler say more studying needs to be done to understand Covid-19 in minks.

“I worry we are not doing enough to monitor that situation to make sure this virus isn’t spilling into the animal populations,” Runstadler said. “We should be identifying the interfaces where humans and animals are in close and frequent enough contact that virus spillover is possible, and doing surveillance.”

At fur farms, scientists have seen Covid-19 transfer from minks to cats through mink manure, and are worried about what would happen if it gets into wildlife populations.

“The other area to be concerned about is having this virus spill into an animal host that becomes a regional or local reservoir for viral infections,” Runstadler said.

Zombie Minks

The decision to cull the minks was a drastic one.

“The easiest way to get rid of a problem is to get rid of the problem,” Weese said, “but that’s not always the best way.”

Part of the problem, he explained, is that we don’t know the effects of the spread. If farms with outbreaks were isolated, it’s not known whether the virus would circulate through all the minks and eventually die out.

“We want to keep this a human virus,” Weese said. Culling is often the answer when data on animal spread is inconclusive. “When you’ve got a disease that is killing lots of people, there is less willingness to be lax with the animal side,” he said. Plus, people don’t have the close attachment to minks they might dogs. If the animal isn’t a common pet or an endangered zoo animal, there’s less outrage when it’s killed.

Thousands of killed mink being buried at the Jydske Dragonregiment’s training ground at Noerre Felding near Holstebro in Denmark, after Denmark, the world’s biggest producer of mink fur, had announced it would cull all of the country’s minks after a mutated version of the new coronavirus was detected at its mink farms and had spread to people, on Nov. 12, 2020.Morten Stricker / Ritzau Scanpix via AFP – Getty Images file

But Denmark’s decision was not without detractors. Outrage fomented in Denmark after images and videos of botched killings and mass mink graves circulated, and farmers spoke to the hardship this would cause them.

“We have 65,000 mink. In the coming week all will be put down,” Danish mink farmer Martin From told the BBC in November. “This will end our business.”

Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen apologized for the killing, tearing up as she called it a “regrettable mistake” and admitting the government did not have the legal jurisdiction to cull so many animals.

News of “zombie minks,” pushed up from their shallow and quickly built graves by the gas created from their decomposing bodies, has only furthered anger.

Denmark’s government wants to dig up some of the culled minks from the mass graves.

For animal rights groups, the debacle illustrates why fur farming should be eliminated.

“With or without a cull, the animals on these farms would still be violently killed at some point,” Ashley Byrne, an associate director at PETA, said. “These Covid-19 outbreaks and the grisly circumstances that have gone along with them in the mink industry are just more evidence that the fur industry needs to be finished.”

Byrne called the farms a “recipe for a disaster” in a pandemic, stressing fur farms put humans at risk, too.

But Marc Kaufman, a fur merchant in New York City who sells a lot of mink coats, said there is no reason for his industry to worry about the outbreaks.

“Water rises all,” he said. “With furs, if it’s not made one place, it’s made some place else. Demand is there, and need for the product is there. If Copenhagen doesn’t farm the skins, Russia will. If Russia doesn’t, China will. Either way there is gonna be a supply because there is demand.”

Kaufman, whose family has been in the business since 1870, said his shop is busier this year than last, and customers aren’t talking about the minks getting Covid-19.

“They put down cows when they have cow disease, they put down chickens when they have salmonella, this isn’t the first time animals have been killed for disease purposes. Things happen.” he said. “When it gets cold, people need fur.”

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Some SoCal hospitals already at capacity amid COVID-19 surge – KABC-TV

LOS ANGELES (KABC) — Hospitalizations in California are surging, raising concern about how hospitals will handle the expected crush as some are already at capacity.

The COVID-19 forecast by Gov. Gavin Newsom calls for a hospital nightmare just in time for Christmas Eve.

Newsom said if the current trend continues, ICU beds are expected to be at 112% of capacity by mid-December.

In Southern California, the ICU capacity is expected to hit 107%, and some hospitals are already at full capacity.

RELATED: Coronavirus was likely in US as early as December 2019

“Both of our medical centers, 100% of our beds are being used,” said Dr. Alp Arkun, the assistant medical director for Kaiser Permanente San Bernardino, which runs hospitals in Fontana and Ontario.

The facilities there have seen a 220% increase in COVID-19 patients over the past four weeks.

But even though every bed there is filled, Arkun says the hospitals are ready to double up patients in rooms if they have to.

“We are looking at every lever, every possibility, every nook and cranny utilized maximally, leveraging our entire system of all of our medical centers in Southern California in order to maintain safe, quality patient care,” Arkun said.

All across Southern California, hospitals are prepping and bracing for even worse numbers in this holiday spike. In Los Angeles County, its hospitalization numbers are surging, with 2,316 people now hospitalized for COVID-19, and about a quarter of those in the ICU.

The Hospital Association of Southern California on Tuesday told Eyewitness News its hospital bed capacities are currently sufficient at most of its hospitals, but “occupancy varies by county – and even within a given county – hospitals are experiencing disparate impacts.”

“This pandemic is once again surging, and its spread is expected to be worse than ever at a time when supplies remain hard to come by,” a statement from the association said in part.

“We are currently overcapacity at ICU, so we are overflowing to another area of the hospital,” said Dr. Bernard Klein, the chief executive of Providence Holy Cross Medical Center in Mission Hills.

Klein calls the COVID-19 spike a super surge, and over the holiday weekend, his hospital was forced to turn patients away.

“We have so many high acuity patients, both up on the floor and in the ER, that we wanted to make sure that we could take care of them safely,” Klein said.

Key to preventing a hospital overload is early treatment. Experts warn that those who wait too long before seeking treatment have the hardest time beating COVID-19 and spend more time in the hospital.

Copyright © 2020 KABC-TV. All Rights Reserved.

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Hillcrest Commons in Pittsfield reports over 200 COVID-19 cases among residents, staff – WWLP.com

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Dr. Frankovichs Final Address on the Pandemic: Im Hopeful We Will Celebrate Its End Soon, and Well Celebrate it Together, All of Us – Lost Coast Outpost

Today was Dr. Teresa Frankovich’s last day as Humboldt County’s health officer. Frankovich was hired to the nominally part-time position shortly before the pandemic began and resigned — technically — at the beginning of September. Events turned the job into something she had not signed up for.

Deputy Health Officer Dr. Josh Ennis will fill the position until next week, when the Board of Supervisors is expected to name a permanent new successor. Frankovich will be sticking around; in the future, she’ll serve the county as a deputy health officer, on the part-time basis she was originally hired for.

Today she took questions from local media outlets, and she has been doing since nearly the beginning of the pandemic, and she said farewell to the county with a very moving exhortation to her fellow citizens to keep the faith for just a little while longer. It looks very likely that the end is in sight.

Video above; rough transcript below.

###

Hello. As some of you may be aware, today is my last official day as the Health Officer for
Humboldt County. Next Tuesday, Dec. 8, the Board of Supervisors will have approval of
the new health officer on their agenda. Until then, Dr. Ennis, deputy health officer, will
provide coverage. On Dec. 14, I will be moving into my new, part-time supporting deputy health
officer role. We will be doing media on Friday to provide information about the transition,
and the incoming health officer. Before I respond to today’s questions, I just want to say again how
grateful I am for having had the opportunity to serve as the health officer for Humboldt County.

I have found out the hard way that the fastest way to learn what is at the core of your new community
is to face a pandemic together. I don’t recommend this approach. But the gift has been seeing the
incredible heart of this place, the way most of us have recognized this as the moment to practice
what we teach our children about kindness and the responsibility we all have to one another.

And as hard and exhausting as this has been, I would do it all again,
because it has been a privilege to be able to do important work, and to do it alongside and
on behalf of people I deeply respect and admire. Every day I am literally surrounded by my personal
heroes at Public Health and the EOC who have given their all to this effort for 10 months now,
and still show up every day to do it again. This includes every person supporting this effort,
and all of those holding down the fort on everything else that still needs to get done.
For a very long time, longer than every other large county, we held COVID-19 at bay.

Finally, as most of the country and the state surged in cases, we began to see the impossibility
of keeping COVID forever outside our gate. But the time gained has made us far better prepared
than we would have been last spring. As of next week, we will have tripled our Optum capacity,
including a mobile unit that will test five days a week in locations across the county.

This asset, together with our outstanding internal lab, will bring testing capacity to well over
3,000 specimens per week, more than 100 times what we could do at the start of the pandemic.
In addition, our new regional testing partnership with UIHS and Del Norte County,
is finalizing its preparations and is expected to begin adding to our capacity sometime
this month. Our stellar contact investigation team has been expanded and refined over time.
Together, we have made the move to a state contact tracing platform, bringing increased efficiencies
to our process, new tools and additional staffing to meet the growing response need.

Our alternate care site preparations are nearly complete through the dedication of our EOC team
and our partner in this effort, St. Joseph Hospital. I see this as an incredible safety
net for our community as we watch what is playing out across the country and in parts of California.
We still hope to never need it, but it will be there if we do.

Our Joint Information Center team continues to do what it has done in extraordinary fashion
from the start, helping to ensure everyone in the community has the information
they need to navigate through this pandemic. Those in the community who have called for information
are met with warmth and civility and answers to their questions in real time.

Finally, to all of you, the journalists in our community, who have worked so hard to inform
the public throughout the pandemic, I extend my deepest thanks. We’ve all been talking about COVID
and living with COVID for a long time and it would be tempting to move on and drift away in coverage,
but you have steadfastly hung in there, following the science and bringing it to Humboldt residents,
and for that I am forever grateful. Your dedication has helped to keep our friends and
relatives safer.

We’re entering a challenging period in this pandemic, with surging cases
and threatened hospital capacity statewide. It’s going to take concerted effort by all of us,
and continued sacrifice, to move through this wave with fewer severely ill individuals,
and fewer lives lost. But the vaccine is coming, data suggests it will be safe and effective and
is likely to be the thing that propels us forward out of this pandemic and the enormous toll it has
taken on all parts of our community, children, families, businesses, schools, and the most
vulnerable across the county. But I am hopeful we will celebrate its end soon, and we’ll celebrate
it together, all of us, healthy and together. It will be a most amazing day.

The North Coast Journal asks, “On your last day as Humboldt County’s full-time health officer,
what advice would you offer your successor?”

Wow. Well, um, I think the biggest thing is really
listening and asking questions. I think we have developed an incredible amount of expertise here,
within our Public Health department, within our EOC, and with our state experts. And I
think forging relationships, asking questions, and being willing at the end to take all the
information and make a decision that may not be the popular one, but is the right one to do,
I think is probably most important. That and reading everything you can read is essential.

The North Coast Journal asks, “What have been the most rewarding and challenging aspects of
the job for you personally?”

Well I think the most rewarding has clearly been the people I’ve
been working with and the community, there’s no doubt. Obviously there have been some people who
are not supportive about what we’ve been doing, but it is, I believe, a minority of people.
The vast majority of our community has been extremely supportive and helpful in moving us
forward, and that has been incredibly rewarding. I think the single most challenging issue has been
the lack of national policy on COVID-19 response, and the political divisiveness that arose
out of that and I think it has made this more complicated than it had to be, and
I think it’ll be a lesson learned going forward.

The North Coast Journal asks, “Reflecting on the past eight months, what do you consider
to be the county’s biggest successes and shortcomings in responding to COVID-19?”

Well, you know the successes I think are pretty evident. I think the infrastructure
we’ve been able to build, in a cooperative way across the community, speaks for itself.
I think it’s really been an amazing, amazing team effort to accomplish that. The shortcomings,
I think when we go back and look at all the response, I’m sure we’re going to find things
we could have done quicker or better, it’s inevitable, and we’ll learn lessons from that.
Hopefully we will not need them for a long time, but we’ll learn from it.
But overall I’ve been tremendously impressed by what Humboldt’s been able to do.

The North Coast Journal asks, “What do you envision your role in Humboldt County’s
pandemic response will be moving forward?”

Well I will be here as long as I’m needed,
I will be working in a support role, part time, which will allow some of the flexibility I needed,
so I look forward to contributing, and to being here when it’s done.

The North Coast Journal asks, “The governor warned yesterday that need in Northern California
hospitals is projected to eclipse capacity by Dec. 24 if current infection rates continue.
Do local models and projections show a similar trend? If infection rates continue, when do you
anticipate local hospitals will run out of beds or the healthcare workers needed to staff them?”

I think that if we continue at the current pace, we may have issues prior to the 24th
on a statewide basis, but locally we don’t actually construct models, our numbers are
small enough that it makes it somewhat challenging to have something that’s predictive, but we do
watch what’s happening across the state with our local data. I certainly have concerns about the
impact on health care capacity locally with the case rate increase that we’re seeing right now.
I think our hospitals have built an incredible amount of increased capacity,
I think they have brought on increased equipment, including things like ventilators,
as in many other places, we will need to staff all of that to provide adequate care.
But my hope is that with some of the measures we have taken preventatively,
with sort of ratcheting down our activity locally, that we may be able to prevent
moving that far. But we have to prepare as if that may happen some time in December.

The North Coast Journal asks, “Some California hospitals are already in danger of exceeding
available capacity. To your knowledge have there been any discussions about transferring patients
into the county from other areas?”

Well certainly through our hospital-wide system,
there are requests made through our Emergency Response, and for beds,
if a facility is having difficulty, so we see those all the time. For the most part,
those are in areas that are quite far from us and logistically not appropriate for transfer. So
we haven’t really looked at transfers to our facility at this time.

The North Coast Journal asks, “You and Dr. Ennis have spoken repeatedly about available healthcare
workforce being a likely limiting factor in efforts to increase local hospital capacity to
meet a surge. Can you speak to current efforts to expand workforce capacity and where they stand?”

We continue efforts with our partners, discussions about how we will pull workforce into this. One
thing I do want to point out is that again, we’ve designed the alternate care site to be very low
acuity, really meant to be a valve, a pressure valve for the hospital, to take people who are
nearly ready to go home, and provide a little bit of care for a day or two until they are ready
to do so. So our staffing levels will not need to be very high to be able to accomplish that,
and that will make staffing overall much easier. We’re counting on all of our health care
friends in the county to step in and help when we need that,
and we also have our disaster service volunteers that we will be looking at as well. In addition,
the state potentially has assets, depending on what’s happening,
and the state of course is able to ask the federal government as well. So, it’s a work in progress.

The Times-Standard asks, “Has Humboldt County seen any impact of the surge on local testing
capabilities? If so, how? And is this being addressed?”

Well we’ve certainly
seen an increase in testing volume and the need for that, and so we are very fortunate
to have that Optum expansion to help meet that need. We’ve been ramping up internally
hugely as well, I think our lab had over 1,200 specimens last week that they received.
And we continue to work on our regional testing partnership to increase testing further.
Finally we are receiving some rapid tests that we can help to distribute to acute care settings,
so that they will have some ability to test symptomatic people in front of them,
with a rapid point of care test, and these tests perform very well, actually for symptomatic
individuals. So that should improve capacity as well. But we’re definitely feeling the strain.

The Times-Standard asks, “Where is Humboldt County at, as far
as acquiring freezers to hold COVID-19 vaccine?”

We’re very fortunate because our partner, Providence St. Joseph Healthcare,
procured ultra-low temperature so that we’re able to use those for storage of vaccines and the
capacity there should actually serve the community well. It’s a great benefit for our community and
we really appreciate that. So, we’re working collaboratively with them. These first doses
will be targeted for healthcare workers and we hope to see these actually very soon in December.

The Times-Standard asks, “Can Dr. Frankovich address what changes
the county might be seeing with a new stay-at-home order this week?”

I really don’t know. I was in a discussion with health officers and public health directors
across the state this morning providing feedback of what that could look like.
The governor’s office is obviously planning with the state public health leadership as well.
I don’t know what the final plan is going to look like, all I know is they are looking for
basically some concrete time limited interventions that are likely to be effective,
highly effective. We want to use lessons learned from our previous shelter-in-place to inform this.

The Lost Coast Outpost asks… “What’s the most important thing you’ve learned during the
county’s management of the pandemic? What advice will you have for your successor?”

I think as I alluded to earlier, I think a big part of this is relationships.
I was new coming into this position, so I needed to forge those relationships. We’ve
had a relatively long period to do that and the nice thing is that we really have solidified
those with our partners across the county. And that means in a time like this, we are better
positioned to respond because we are all very connected. Those relationships are a resource
that rural communities really have in spades. And that really helps us out in a time of crisis. So
that is really a good lesson learned from this. The other thing i would simply say,
is that I know our business community has taken a huge hit through this COVID pandemic. The length
of it and the restrictions are just daunting and so i do think we need to do increasing work with
outreach to and in support of our business communities to help them through this. Thank you.

The Lost Coast Outpost asks… “Yesterday, Gov. Gavin Newsom hinted that California may be
prepared to introduce new emergency measures to slow the rapid spread of the virus. What sorts
of additional measures available to the state would be most effective in accomplishing that?”

Again, we really don’t know what this is going to look like. It really, I would imagine,
will be looking at sector by sector. What type of restrictions make sense. What would have the
most sort of bang for the buck, in terms of what we’re doing. And asking of people. And again,
learning lessons from previous interventions that we’ve used to see what might be most helpful.
I expect we’ll hear something this week.

The North Coast News asks… “With the CDPH recommending this week that all hospitals
have staff tested for COVID-19 weekly, have protocols changed at hospitals here in Humboldt
County? Have COVID-19 infections among health care workers impacted hospital staffing negatively?”

So far we’ve actually been very lucky and had very little impact on our hospital setting in terms of
healthcare worker infections. And I credit them with the precautions they’re taking and the
prevention pieces they’ve put in place. But we’ve also benefited from the fact that we have had
a relatively low prevalence of illness. So, those prevention measures are all going to be
increasingly important. In terms of the hospital testing, this is a new recommendation from the
state and there is a timeline for hospitals to begin implementing this. We are in discussions
with the hospitals about what strategies we can use to meet this. It’s a big lift to test all
healthcare hospital staff, or all hospital staff in our community.

The Redheaded Blackbelt asks… “How
many supplemental hospital staff are, as of this moment, enlisted to work the overflow site
in the event that our local ICU is at capacity in the immediate future?”

Well we don’t have a roster of people that are signed up to do this. We will
at that time – we have to make certain planning assumptions which are that
certain healthcare operations are not going to be functioning as normal.
If we are in a surge situation, those folks become available to help serve in this effort.
And we are again constantly updating and reviewing our volunteer network that we have as well. So,
it’s again an ongoing conversation across the healthcare community about how we’ll do this,
but we’re counting on our partners to really step forward when we need it.

The Redheaded Blackbelt asks… “We’re trying to understand the ICU occupancy information.
How many patients are currently in the ICU in the entire county?”

Yesterday, according to the state site, we had zero ICU beds available
(though we believe the county has a total of 18 overall but “only” 5 COVID hospitalizations.
It is really challenging to read this online. The problem is that most of the numbers that
are presented are related to staffed beds. And our hospitals staff according to census.
So if there are more patients, they bring on more staff, which increases bed capacity.
What I would say is that we really are seeing – we do have some COVID hospitalizations. We
really have not seen that as a primary driver of our hospital occupancy at this point,
but hospitals obviously have a lot of other patients who need care and that is one thing
we’ve been talking about is that we not only have to be able to house COVID patients,
but everyone else who may need care. People who have heart attacks, strokes, people who have
other urgent situations that need care. So we are monitoring this constantly as are the hospitals.

The Redheaded Blackbelt asks… “Have the average wait times for COVID test results
jumped? For instance, one woman was tested on the 17th and has not yet received her results.”

Well I know that the Optum site now is sending all of its specimens to the state lab in Valencia.
That lab is contractually committed to really good turnaround times of about 48 hours, but we have to
add in our transit. I’ve been actually seeing some really good turnaround times from that.
So I’m surprised by this particular test result, but I do know as they first ramped up,
there were some growing pains there. So it’s not impossible. I would just say that overall
I’m actually really encouraged by what we’re seeing right now, in terms of turnaround.

Thank you Dr. Frankovich, and thank you for your service.

Thank you.

Categories
Uncategorized

A new study found coronavirus may have been in the US in December. That doesnt mean youll ever know if you had it then – msnNOW

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CNN’s Don Lemon discusses with infectious disease expert Michael Osterholm. “,”descriptionText”:”The CDC will soon issue new guidelines decreasing coronavirus quarantine time from 14 to 7-10 days, two senior administration officials told CNN. 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CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/stephanie-elam-profile” target=”_blank”>Stephanie Elamu003c/a> reports these parties are getting shut down.”},{“title”:”ICU nurse: Reach out to the frontline workers in your life”,”duration”:”02:57″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/health/2020/11/28/coronavirus-frontline-worker-shift-mental-health-impact-icu-nurse-alison-johnson-nr-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”health/2020/11/28/coronavirus-frontline-worker-shift-mental-health-impact-icu-nurse-alison-johnson-nr-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201128170701-coronavirus-frontline-worker-shift-mental-health-impact-icu-nurse-alison-johnson-nr-vpx-00000412-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/health/2020/11/28/coronavirus-frontline-worker-shift-mental-health-impact-icu-nurse-alison-johnson-nr-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/”,”description”:”Alison Johnson, a registered nurse and director of the critical care unit at Johnson City Medical Center in Tennessee, explains the u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/2020/11/28/health/us-coronavirus-saturday/index.html” target=”_blank”>impact a pandemicu003c/a> makes on hospitals. She tells CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/boris-sanchez-profile” target=”_blank”>Boris Sanchezu003c/a> the mental health toll is as real as coronavirus. If you or someone you know needs help, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK.”,”descriptionText”:”Alison Johnson, a registered nurse and director of the critical care unit at Johnson City Medical Center in Tennessee, explains the u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/2020/11/28/health/us-coronavirus-saturday/index.html” target=”_blank”>impact a pandemicu003c/a> makes on hospitals. She tells CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/boris-sanchez-profile” target=”_blank”>Boris Sanchezu003c/a> the mental health toll is as real as coronavirus. If you or someone you know needs help, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK.”},{“title”:”Doctor: Holiday travel like pouring gasoline on surging cases”,”duration”:”03:21″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/health/2020/11/27/coronavirus-daily-wrap-post-thanksgiving-watt-tsr-dnt-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”health/2020/11/27/coronavirus-daily-wrap-post-thanksgiving-watt-tsr-dnt-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201120160629-airport-passengers-salt-lake-city-1027-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/health/2020/11/27/coronavirus-daily-wrap-post-thanksgiving-watt-tsr-dnt-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/”,”description”:”As the US hits 13 million recorded cases of Covid-19, physicians say to expect the death toll to rise in the coming weeks. CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/nick-watt” target=”_blank”>Nick Wattu003c/a> reports.”,”descriptionText”:”As the US hits 13 million recorded cases of Covid-19, physicians say to expect the death toll to rise in the coming weeks. CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/nick-watt” target=”_blank”>Nick Wattu003c/a> reports.”},{“title”:”Canada’s ‘Atlantic bubble’ has been a sanctuary. But it may be bursting soon”,”duration”:”03:31″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com/”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2020/11/27/canada-atlantic-bubble-coronavirus-covid-19-newton-pkg-intl-hnk-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2020/11/27/canada-atlantic-bubble-coronavirus-covid-19-newton-pkg-intl-hnk-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201127101326-screengrab-canada-bubble-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2020/11/27/canada-atlantic-bubble-coronavirus-covid-19-newton-pkg-intl-hnk-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/”,”description”:”At Canada’s outer edge, the country’s “Atlantic bubble” is just a six hour drive from Boston, but a world away from the Covid-19 reality. Here, 2.5 million people have been living with limited Covid-19 cases due to strict regional restrictions. Yet, the bubble itself is vulnerable as a new wave approaches. CNN’s Paula Newton reports. “,”descriptionText”:”At Canada’s outer edge, the country’s “Atlantic bubble” is just a six hour drive from Boston, but a world away from the Covid-19 reality. Here, 2.5 million people have been living with limited Covid-19 cases due to strict regional restrictions. Yet, the bubble itself is vulnerable as a new wave approaches. CNN’s Paula Newton reports. “},{“title”:”A Covid-19 vaccine won’t be a magic bullet”,”duration”:”03:31″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/health/2020/11/20/will-covid-vaccine-end-pandemic-lon-orig-na.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”health/2020/11/20/will-covid-vaccine-end-pandemic-lon-orig-na.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201120163142-digvid-vaccine-explainer-thumbnail-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/health/2020/11/20/will-covid-vaccine-end-pandemic-lon-orig-na.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/”,”description”:”Having a safe and effective vaccine is a turning point in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic. But there are many challenging steps ahead — from making large quantities to delivery around the world — before a vaccine can have an impact on the spread of the virus. “,”descriptionText”:”Having a safe and effective vaccine is a turning point in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic. 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CNN’s Don Lemon discusses with infectious disease expert Michael Osterholm. “,”descriptionText”:”The CDC will soon issue new guidelines decreasing coronavirus quarantine time from 14 to 7-10 days, two senior administration officials told CNN. CNN’s Don Lemon discusses with infectious disease expert Michael Osterholm. “},{“title”:”Here’s what you need to know about getting the Covid-19 vaccine”,”duration”:”03:16″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com/”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/health/2020/12/01/what-you-need-to-know-about-getting-coronavirus-vaccine-todd-tsr-pkg-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”health/2020/12/01/what-you-need-to-know-about-getting-coronavirus-vaccine-todd-tsr-pkg-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201201181444-coronavirus-vaccine-dnt-todd-tsr-12012020-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/health/2020/12/01/what-you-need-to-know-about-getting-coronavirus-vaccine-todd-tsr-pkg-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/”,”description”:”CNN’s u003ca href=”https://www.cnn.com/profiles/brian-todd-profile” target=”_blank”>Brian Toddu003c/a> reports on what we need to know about the safety, side effects and timelines of the Covid-19 vaccine. “,”descriptionText”:”CNN’s u003ca href=”https://www.cnn.com/profiles/brian-todd-profile” target=”_blank”>Brian Toddu003c/a> reports on what we need to know about the safety, side effects and timelines of the Covid-19 vaccine. “},{“title”:”Health care staff and long term care facility residents to get vaccine first”,”duration”:”03:21″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”http://www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/health/2020/12/01/cdc-panel-vote-vaccine-distribution-sitroom-watt-gupta-sots-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”health/2020/12/01/cdc-panel-vote-vaccine-distribution-sitroom-watt-gupta-sots-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201130072532-file-01-moderna-coronavirus-vaccine-trial-0727-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/health/2020/12/01/cdc-panel-vote-vaccine-distribution-sitroom-watt-gupta-sots-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/”,”description”:”A CDC panel voted 13-1 to recommend health care workers and residents of long term care facilities will be the first recipients of the Covid-19 vaccine when it becomes available. Wolf Blitzer discusses with CNN’s Nick Watt and Dr. Sanjay Gupta.”,”descriptionText”:”A CDC panel voted 13-1 to recommend health care workers and residents of long term care facilities will be the first recipients of the Covid-19 vaccine when it becomes available. Wolf Blitzer discusses with CNN’s Nick Watt and Dr. Sanjay Gupta.”},{“title”:”Michigan couple dies of Covid-19 just one minute apart”,”duration”:”01:29″,”sourceName”:”WDIV”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.clickondetroit.com/”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/health/2020/12/01/michigan-couple-dies-one-minute-apart-coronavirus-vpx.wdiv/index.xml”,”videoId”:”health/2020/12/01/michigan-couple-dies-one-minute-apart-coronavirus-vpx.wdiv”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201201181544-mi-couple-dies-of-covid-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/health/2020/12/01/michigan-couple-dies-one-minute-apart-coronavirus-vpx.wdiv/video/playlists/coronavirus/”,”description”:”Leslie and Patricia McWaters, a Michigan couple married nearly 47 years, both died from Covid-19 a minute apart. CNN affiliate WDIV has more. “,”descriptionText”:”Leslie and Patricia McWaters, a Michigan couple married nearly 47 years, both died from Covid-19 a minute apart. CNN affiliate WDIV has more. “},{“title”:”See emotional interview of nurse who lost husband and mom to virus”,”duration”:”05:04″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com/”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/health/2020/12/01/icu-nurse-lizanne-jennings-lost-husband-and-mother-to-covid-19-intv-nr-bolduan-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”health/2020/12/01/icu-nurse-lizanne-jennings-lost-husband-and-mother-to-covid-19-intv-nr-bolduan-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201201121900-lizanne-jennings-vpx-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/health/2020/12/01/icu-nurse-lizanne-jennings-lost-husband-and-mother-to-covid-19-intv-nr-bolduan-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/”,”description”:”ICU nurse Lizanne Jennings speaks with CNN’s u003ca href=”https://www.cnn.com/profiles/kate-bolduan-profile” target=”_blank”>Kate Bolduanu003c/a> about losing her mother and husband to Covid-19, only three days apart.”,”descriptionText”:”ICU nurse Lizanne Jennings speaks with CNN’s u003ca href=”https://www.cnn.com/profiles/kate-bolduan-profile” target=”_blank”>Kate Bolduanu003c/a> about losing her mother and husband to Covid-19, only three days apart.”},{“title”:”Family has heartbreaking dilemma amid pandemic”,”duration”:”04:20″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com/”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/us/2020/12/01/texas-child-immune-system-coronavirus-pandemic-lavandera-pkg-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”us/2020/12/01/texas-child-immune-system-coronavirus-pandemic-lavandera-pkg-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201130213019-jessica-lusk-dylan-garcia-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/us/2020/12/01/texas-child-immune-system-coronavirus-pandemic-lavandera-pkg-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/”,”description”:”Jessica Lusk and Dylan Garcia face financial ruin after leaving their jobs to protect their daughter’s life amidst the novel coronavirus pandemic. CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/ed-lavandera-profile” target=”_blank”>Ed Lavanderau003c/a> has the story.”,”descriptionText”:”Jessica Lusk and Dylan Garcia face financial ruin after leaving their jobs to protect their daughter’s life amidst the novel coronavirus pandemic. CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/ed-lavandera-profile” target=”_blank”>Ed Lavanderau003c/a> has the story.”},{“title”:”New York City public schools set to reopen”,”duration”:”02:58″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/us/2020/11/29/new-york-city-public-schools-reopen-marquez-nr-sot-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”us/2020/11/29/new-york-city-public-schools-reopen-marquez-nr-sot-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/200927151329-new-york-city-schools-reopen-mcmorris-santoro-1-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/us/2020/11/29/new-york-city-public-schools-reopen-marquez-nr-sot-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/”,”description”:”New York City public schools will resume in-person classes during a phased reopening process beginning on December 7. CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/miguel-marquez-profile” target=”_blank”>Miguel Marquezu003c/a> reports.”,”descriptionText”:”New York City public schools will resume in-person classes during a phased reopening process beginning on December 7. CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/miguel-marquez-profile” target=”_blank”>Miguel Marquezu003c/a> reports.”},{“title”:”Giroir: This is how we get out of the pandemic”,”duration”:”02:45″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”http://www.cnn.com/”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/politics/2020/11/29/admiral-brett-giroir-vaccine-distribution-warp-speed-sot-sotu-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”politics/2020/11/29/admiral-brett-giroir-vaccine-distribution-warp-speed-sot-sotu-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201129143223-admiral-brett-giroir-vaccine-distribution-warp-speed-sot-sotu-vpx-00002509-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/politics/2020/11/29/admiral-brett-giroir-vaccine-distribution-warp-speed-sot-sotu-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/”,”description”:”Admiral Brett Giroir, the White House’s coronavirus testing czar, tells CNN’s Dana Bash he hopes the US will have enough vaccines to immunize 20 million Americans by the end of the year. “,”descriptionText”:”Admiral Brett Giroir, the White House’s coronavirus testing czar, tells CNN’s Dana Bash he hopes the US will have enough vaccines to immunize 20 million Americans by the end of the year. “},{“title”:”26 states set records for coronavirus hospitalizations Thanksgiving week”,”duration”:”02:22″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com/?refresh=1″,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/health/2020/11/29/coronavirus-hospitalizations-deaths-raju-hotez-ip-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”health/2020/11/29/coronavirus-hospitalizations-deaths-raju-hotez-ip-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201129083228-coronavirus-mw-manu-raju-11-29-2020-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/health/2020/11/29/coronavirus-hospitalizations-deaths-raju-hotez-ip-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/”,”description”:”Following a month of skyrocketing Covid-19 cases, u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/2020/11/29/health/us-coronavirus-sunday/index.html” target=”_blank”>the US has reached its highest number yet of hospitalizations due to the virus.u003c/a> The US surpassed 80,000 daily hospitalizations on November 19 and set new records steadily for 17 days straight until Friday, according to the COVID Tracking Project. Then on Saturday, the number reached 91,635.”,”descriptionText”:”Following a month of skyrocketing Covid-19 cases, u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/2020/11/29/health/us-coronavirus-sunday/index.html” target=”_blank”>the US has reached its highest number yet of hospitalizations due to the virus.u003c/a> The US surpassed 80,000 daily hospitalizations on November 19 and set new records steadily for 17 days straight until Friday, according to the COVID Tracking Project. Then on Saturday, the number reached 91,635.”},{“title”:”Doctor comforting elderly patient in heartbreaking photo speaks out”,”duration”:”05:32″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com/”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/us/2020/11/30/elderly-patient-thanksgiving-coronavirus-intv-berman-newday-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”us/2020/11/30/elderly-patient-thanksgiving-coronavirus-intv-berman-newday-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201129160537-05-covid19-november-numbers-records-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/us/2020/11/30/elderly-patient-thanksgiving-coronavirus-intv-berman-newday-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/”,”description”:”CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/john-berman-profile” target=”_blank”>John Bermanu003c/a> speaks with Dr. Joseph Varon, chief of staff at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston, about a heartbreaking photo that captures him consoling an elderly patient on Thanksgiving. “,”descriptionText”:”CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/john-berman-profile” target=”_blank”>John Bermanu003c/a> speaks with Dr. Joseph Varon, chief of staff at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston, about a heartbreaking photo that captures him consoling an elderly patient on Thanksgiving. “},{“title”:”Police crack down on secret warehouse parties”,”duration”:”02:27″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”http://www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/us/2020/11/29/secret-warehouse-parties-busted-pandemic-coronavirus-elam-dnt-nr-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”us/2020/11/29/secret-warehouse-parties-busted-pandemic-coronavirus-elam-dnt-nr-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201128194521-secret-warehouse-parties-busted-pandemic-coronavirus-elam-dnt-nr-vpx-00000127-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/us/2020/11/29/secret-warehouse-parties-busted-pandemic-coronavirus-elam-dnt-nr-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/”,”description”:”Even as cases and hospitalizations spike across the country, police are seeing a spate of crowded underground parties — in violation of local u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/2020/11/28/health/us-coronavirus-saturday/index.html” target=”_blank”>coronavirus guidelinesu003c/a>. CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/stephanie-elam-profile” target=”_blank”>Stephanie Elamu003c/a> reports these parties are getting shut down.”,”descriptionText”:”Even as cases and hospitalizations spike across the country, police are seeing a spate of crowded underground parties — in violation of local u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/2020/11/28/health/us-coronavirus-saturday/index.html” target=”_blank”>coronavirus guidelinesu003c/a>. CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/stephanie-elam-profile” target=”_blank”>Stephanie Elamu003c/a> reports these parties are getting shut down.”},{“title”:”ICU nurse: Reach out to the frontline workers in your life”,”duration”:”02:57″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/health/2020/11/28/coronavirus-frontline-worker-shift-mental-health-impact-icu-nurse-alison-johnson-nr-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”health/2020/11/28/coronavirus-frontline-worker-shift-mental-health-impact-icu-nurse-alison-johnson-nr-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201128170701-coronavirus-frontline-worker-shift-mental-health-impact-icu-nurse-alison-johnson-nr-vpx-00000412-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/health/2020/11/28/coronavirus-frontline-worker-shift-mental-health-impact-icu-nurse-alison-johnson-nr-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/”,”description”:”Alison Johnson, a registered nurse and director of the critical care unit at Johnson City Medical Center in Tennessee, explains the u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/2020/11/28/health/us-coronavirus-saturday/index.html” target=”_blank”>impact a pandemicu003c/a> makes on hospitals. She tells CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/boris-sanchez-profile” target=”_blank”>Boris Sanchezu003c/a> the mental health toll is as real as coronavirus. If you or someone you know needs help, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK.”,”descriptionText”:”Alison Johnson, a registered nurse and director of the critical care unit at Johnson City Medical Center in Tennessee, explains the u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/2020/11/28/health/us-coronavirus-saturday/index.html” target=”_blank”>impact a pandemicu003c/a> makes on hospitals. She tells CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/boris-sanchez-profile” target=”_blank”>Boris Sanchezu003c/a> the mental health toll is as real as coronavirus. If you or someone you know needs help, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK.”},{“title”:”Doctor: Holiday travel like pouring gasoline on surging cases”,”duration”:”03:21″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/health/2020/11/27/coronavirus-daily-wrap-post-thanksgiving-watt-tsr-dnt-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”health/2020/11/27/coronavirus-daily-wrap-post-thanksgiving-watt-tsr-dnt-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201120160629-airport-passengers-salt-lake-city-1027-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/health/2020/11/27/coronavirus-daily-wrap-post-thanksgiving-watt-tsr-dnt-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/”,”description”:”As the US hits 13 million recorded cases of Covid-19, physicians say to expect the death toll to rise in the coming weeks. CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/nick-watt” target=”_blank”>Nick Wattu003c/a> reports.”,”descriptionText”:”As the US hits 13 million recorded cases of Covid-19, physicians say to expect the death toll to rise in the coming weeks. CNN’s u003ca href=”http://www.cnn.com/profiles/nick-watt” target=”_blank”>Nick Wattu003c/a> reports.”},{“title”:”Canada’s ‘Atlantic bubble’ has been a sanctuary. But it may be bursting soon”,”duration”:”03:31″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com/”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/world/2020/11/27/canada-atlantic-bubble-coronavirus-covid-19-newton-pkg-intl-hnk-vpx.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”world/2020/11/27/canada-atlantic-bubble-coronavirus-covid-19-newton-pkg-intl-hnk-vpx.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201127101326-screengrab-canada-bubble-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/world/2020/11/27/canada-atlantic-bubble-coronavirus-covid-19-newton-pkg-intl-hnk-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/”,”description”:”At Canada’s outer edge, the country’s “Atlantic bubble” is just a six hour drive from Boston, but a world away from the Covid-19 reality. Here, 2.5 million people have been living with limited Covid-19 cases due to strict regional restrictions. Yet, the bubble itself is vulnerable as a new wave approaches. CNN’s Paula Newton reports. “,”descriptionText”:”At Canada’s outer edge, the country’s “Atlantic bubble” is just a six hour drive from Boston, but a world away from the Covid-19 reality. Here, 2.5 million people have been living with limited Covid-19 cases due to strict regional restrictions. Yet, the bubble itself is vulnerable as a new wave approaches. CNN’s Paula Newton reports. “},{“title”:”A Covid-19 vaccine won’t be a magic bullet”,”duration”:”03:31″,”sourceName”:”CNN”,”sourceLink”:”https://www.cnn.com”,”videoCMSUrl”:”/video/data/3.0/video/health/2020/11/20/will-covid-vaccine-end-pandemic-lon-orig-na.cnn/index.xml”,”videoId”:”health/2020/11/20/will-covid-vaccine-end-pandemic-lon-orig-na.cnn”,”videoImage”:”//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/201120163142-digvid-vaccine-explainer-thumbnail-large-169.jpg”,”videoUrl”:”/videos/health/2020/11/20/will-covid-vaccine-end-pandemic-lon-orig-na.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/”,”description”:”Having a safe and effective vaccine is a turning point in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic. But there are many challenging steps ahead — from making large quantities to delivery around the world — before a vaccine can have an impact on the spread of the virus. “,”descriptionText”:”Having a safe and effective vaccine is a turning point in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic. But there are many challenging steps ahead — from making large quantities to delivery around the world — before a vaccine can have an impact on the spread of the virus. “}],’js-video_headline-featured-fstxw6′,”,”js-video_source-featured-fstxw6″,true,true,’coronavirus’);if (typeof configObj.context !== ‘string’ || configObj.context.length