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Outbreak accelerates across Alabama, worst week yet for cases and deaths: Week in review – al.com

https://www.al.com/news/2020/07/outbreak-accelerates-across-alabama-worst-week-yet-for-cases-and-deaths-week-in-review.html

The Alabama Department of Public https://bt-hypnotise.com/ on Friday reported 1,953 new coronavirus cases in the state, capping yet another record-breaking week for virus cases in Alabama. The state added more new cases and reported more virus deaths over the last seven days than in any week since the pandemic began.

Alabama didn’t just break virus records this week – it shattered them, and did so often.

The state reached now highs in major coronavirus metrics every single day over the last seven days, including the 7-day averages for new cases, hospitalizations and reported deaths, a record that had stood for months.

The 1,953 cases added on Friday is the second-highest single-day case count ever. This marks the 10th day in a row the state has added at least 1,100 daily cases.

The 7-day average for new cases reached a new record of 1,745.6 on Friday. The record on that measure was 1,283.4 cases per day, set on July 9. The state this week set and broke that record repeatedly, reaching new highs on five out of seven days. By Friday, the rolling average had increased by 43 percent in just one week.

[Can’t see the chart? Click here.]

The state added more than 12,200 new cases from July 11 to July 17, by far the most ever in one week. The previous record, set the week before, was 8,500.

Three Alabama counties added more than 1,000 cases this week, led by Jefferson, home to Birmingham. Jefferson added nearly 1,900 cases over that time, the most any county has ever added in one week. Madison County, home of Huntsville, also set its own record, adding nearly 1,200 cases, and Mobile County added almost 1,100. P

Before this week, Jefferson, the most populous county in the state, was the only one ever to report more than 1,000 cases in a single week.

[Can’t see the chart? Click here.]

https://bt-hypnotise.com/ deaths also reached new highs this week. The 7-day average for daily reported deaths in Alabama topped 20 for the first time on Wednesday. The new record for average daily reported deaths is 22.6, set on Thursday. On Friday, the average stood at 22.

ADPH reported 155 virus deaths in Alabama in the week ending July 17 – smashing the previous record of 113 set all the way back in April.

Prior to this week, the state had only reported 100 deaths in a week twice – both instances happened months go.

[Can’t see the chart? Click here.]

Because of the way deaths are reported, there is often a lag between when someone dies of the virus and when the death gets reported by ADPH. Because of that, many of the deaths reported this week could have happened earlier.

Virus hospitalizations also reached new highs this week. On Friday, the state reported 1,416 patients currently being treated for the virus in Alabama hospitals. The 7-day average for current COVID-19 hospitalizations climbed to 1,299, a new record. Alabama broke that record every day this week.

[Can’t see the chart? Click here.]

Pretty much any way you look at it, this was Alabama’s worst week yet in terms of the coronavirus. But the state isn’t alone. Many Southern states are adding new cases even faster than Alabama.

According to the CDC, as of July 16, the last day for which data was available, Florida had added more than 77,000 new cases in seven days – by far the most in the country, and more than Alabama has seen total. Florida added 363 cases per 100,000 people in that week, the highest rate of any Southern state.

[Can’t see the map? Click here.]

For reference, Alabama’s 12,122 new cases during that time comes out to 248 cases per 100,000 people. That’s the fourth highest among Southern states.

Louisiana added nearly 14,000 new cases during those seven days, for a rate of 300 new cases per 100,000. South Carolina was third, with 13,300 new cases, or 262 in 100,000.

Do you have an idea for a data story about Alabama? Email Ramsey Archibald at rarchibald@al.com, and follow him on Twitter @RamseyArchibald. Read more Alabama data stories here.

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