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How to Spot Tonights Halloween Blue Moon & A Few Planets, Too

Illustration for article titled How to Spot Tonights Halloween Blue Moon  A Few Planets, Too

Photo: Chockdee Permploysiri (Shutterstock)

This year, trick-or-treating probably doesn’t look like you thought it would, and Halloween parties are (hopefully, in the name of public health) cancelled, but there’s still something pretty spectacular going on tonight. Best of all, it’s free and you can probably see it from your own backyard (or fire escape). Not only is there a rare Blue Moon tonight, but there’s also the possibility of spotting Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus. Here’s where and when to find them.

Where and when to find the moon and planets

First things first: the moon will not actually be blue. But, for a brief period—as it rises above the eastern horizon—it will be orange, which is even more appropriate given the holiday. So when exactly will that happen? It depends on where you live, but you can check on that here. In New York City, for example, moonrise will be at 6:13 pm tonight.

According to Jamie Carter at Forbes, here’s where to look:

Look east as the Sun sets in the west. In practice you won’t see the full Moon appear until about 10-15 minutes after the moonrise time because of atmospheric cloud low on the horizon and other obstructions.

What about those planets? Mars will be in the southeast sky, where it’ll be the brightest thing up there, after the moon. Next up: Saturn and Jupiter. “They’ll be the two bright dots dancing next to each other to the west,” Nicholas St. Fleur writes for the New York Times. “Jupiter will outshine its ringed cousin and be the brightest non-moon object on this half of the sky.” Plus, if you’re able to get up before sunrise on Sunday morning, you’ll also be able to see Venus and possibly Mercury below it.

And finally, there’s Uranus. You’re going to need a telescope for this one, and the planet will look like a small blue-green disc. Here’s where to find it, courtesy of Michele Debczak at Mental Floss:

Spotting Uranus at opposition will be slightly more difficult in 2020 than in years past. The phenomenon coincides with a full moon that will make dimmer stars and planets—including Uranus—harder to see in the night sky. The planet sits in the constellation Aries, which regrettably appears close to the moon for most of the night.

Fingers crossed for clear skies!

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Allegheny County reports 174 new coronavirus cases | TribLIVE.com – TribLIVE

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A new CDC study suggests roughly 50% of people living with someone who has COVID-19 get it — usually in less than 5 days – msnNOW

  • A new CDC study suggests it’s very easy to get the coronavirus from someone who’s living in your household.
  • The report showed that roughly half (53%) of people surveyed who were living with a COVID-19 positive person wound up sick within a week, according to their daily self-administered tests.
  • Illnesses were transmitted quickly, with 75% of infections being passed along in five days. 
  • The study authors said that people “who suspect that they might have COVID-19 should isolate, stay at home, and use a separate bedroom and bathroom if feasible.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report released Friday suggests that getting the coronavirus from someone you live with can be quick and easy, no matter their age.

The study, which is ongoing in over 100 households in Nashville, Tennessee and Marshfield, Wisconsin since April, found that roughly half (53%) of study participants living with a sick person who tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, wound up sick themselves within a week. 75% of those secondary cases tested positive for the virus within five days or less, according to their daily, self-administered tests.

“Persons who suspect that they might have COVID-19 should isolate, stay at home, and use a separate bedroom and bathroom if feasible,” the study authors wrote in their report, stressing that isolation should start as soon as the person suspects that they might be sick, even before any testing is done.

Being in the same room with a sick person is dangerous

In the study, most sick patients said they had spent many hours (four or more) together in the same room with the people they live with on the day before they started feeling unwell. That pre-symptomatic period is exactly when health experts suspect that people with the virus are at their most infectious.

“It’s because the disease can spread at that moment that the disease is so contagious,” the World Health Organization’s Executive Director of Health Emergencies, Mike Ryan, said earlier this year. “That’s why it’s spread around the world in such an uncontained way.”

Another factor working against people who share a home with sick patients: airflow. The coronavirus spreads well between people who are indoors, and gathered close together, in poorly-ventilated spaces, so it makes sense that people would be getting infected from those they live, breathe, sleep, and eat with every day.

“We know that the biggest risk is these closed, indoor environments,” University of Maryland virologist Don Milton previously told Insider.

(However, as the study authors noted, it is always possible that some of the participants might’ve gotten infected in some other way.)

In the study, 40% of sick patients were sleeping in the same room as another person in their household, before they knew they were sick. The ages of the study participants ranged from younger than 12 to older than 50 years old. It was possible for household members to opt out of the study, which “did happen, but infrequently,” study author Melissa Rolfes told Insider, in an email.

Put on masks if you have to share space with sick people at home

covid risk home

According to a German study out in August, most coronavirus transmissions occur in private households and retirement homes.

Marius Becker/picture alliance via Getty Images


The study authors suggest that both the sick person and all the people in their household should start wearing masks as soon as they think they might have the virus, “particularly in shared spaces where appropriate distancing is not possible.” You may also want to open up some windows (if it’s not too cold) or get some fans moving, to improve air circulation and blow virus particles away.

If you live with someone who has the virus, you should also stay away from others who don’t live in your house for two weeks, in quarantine. This is because it’s possible that you could have contracted the virus, and could be capable of spreading it to others, without ever knowing you’re contagious. Indeed, in the study, only 40% of sick patients’ housemates who subsequently fell ill had any symptoms when their infection was initially detected by a test.

“Usually if you were to develop symptoms, it’s going to be between, let’s say, two and 12 days,” Dr. Rishi Desai, chief medical officer at Osmosis, and a former Epidemic Intelligence Service officer at the CDC, recently told Insider.

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Michigan sees new single-day high for coronavirus cases, reports 31 deaths – Detroit Free Press

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Tracking COVID-19 in Alaska: 1 death, 447 new cases reported Saturday – Anchorage Daily News

We’re making this important information about the pandemic available without a subscription as a public service. But we depend on reader support to do this work. Please consider joining others in supporting independent journalism in Alaska for just $3.23 a week.

Alaska on Saturday reported one death and 447 new cases of COVID-19, according to the Department of Health and Social Services COVID-19 dashboard.

An Anchorage man in his 70s died with the virus, the state health department said. In total, 82 Alaskans with the virus have died since the start of the pandemic, and Alaska’s death rate per capita remains among the lowest in the country.

A record 76 people were hospitalized with the virus in Alaska as of Saturday, plus 18 people were hospitalized with suspected cases of COVID-19, according to state data.

Saturday’s daily new case tally of 447 is the second-highest since the pandemic began, and follows more than a month of triple-digit daily increases, including a record 526 cases reported last Sunday.

Of the 440 new resident cases reported by the state Saturday, there were 229 in Anchorage, plus eight in Eagle River, four in Chugiak and one in Girdwood; 35 in Fairbanks; 20 in Kenai; 14 in Chevak; 12 in Wasilla; 11 in Juneau; 10 in Bethel; 10 in Soldotna; eight in Palmer; eight in Kodiak; five in Kotzebue; four in Sterling; four in North Pole; three in Nikiski; three in Sitka; two in Homer; two in Utqiagvik; two in Hooper Bay; one in Valdez; one in Anchor Point; one in Seward; one in Delta Junction; one in Tok; one in Willow; one in Douglas; one in Ketchikan; and one in Petersburg.

Among communities smaller than 1,000 people that are not named to protect privacy, there were 23 resident cases in the Bethel Census Area; four in the Nome Census Area; three in the Bristol Bay plus Lake and Peninsula boroughs; two in the Northwest Arctic Borough; two in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area; one in the northern Kenai Peninsula Borough; and one in the Fairbanks North Star Borough.

There were also seven nonresident cases reported Saturday: three in Anchorage, one in Fairbanks, one in Dillingham, one in the Bristol Bay plus Lake and Peninsula boroughs and one classified as unknown.

Of the new cases, it wasn’t clear how many patients were showing symptoms of the virus when they tested positive. While people might get tested more than once, each case reported by the state health department only represents one person.

The state’s testing positivity rate continued to rise and on Friday reached 7.3% over a seven-day rolling average. A positivity rate over 5% can indicate high community transmission and not enough testing, health officials have said.

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AI can detect COVID-19 by listening to your coughs – Engadget

The AI is highly accurate in early tests. After the team trained its model on tens of thousands of cough and dialog samples, the technology recognized 98.5 percent of coughs from people with confirmed COVID-19 cases. It identified 100 percent of people who were ostensibly asymptomatic, too.

There are clear limits. The technology isn’t meant to diagnose symptomatic people, as they might have other conditions that produce similar behavior. And while it’s quite capable, you wouldn’t want to use this for a definitive verdict on whether or not you’re infected.

This isn’t a theoretical exercise, though. The scientists are developing a “user-friendly” app that could be used as a prescreening tool for the virus. You might only have to cough into your phone each day to determine if it’s safe for you to head outside. The researchers even suggest this could put an end to pandemics if the tool was always listening in the background, although that’s a big “if” when it would likely raise privacy issues.

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How to Spot Tonights Halloween Blue Moon & A Few Planets, Too

Illustration for article titled How to Spot Tonights Halloween Blue Moon  A Few Planets, Too

Photo: Chockdee Permploysiri (Shutterstock)

This year, trick-or-treating probably doesn’t look like you thought it would, and Halloween parties are (hopefully, in the name of public health) cancelled, but there’s still something pretty spectacular going on tonight. Best of all, it’s free and you can probably see it from your own backyard (or fire escape). Not only is there a rare Blue Moon tonight, but there’s also the possibility of spotting Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus. Here’s where and when to find them.

Where and when to find the moon and planets

First things first: the moon will not actually be blue. But, for a brief period—as it rises above the eastern horizon—it will be orange, which is even more appropriate given the holiday. So when exactly will that happen? It depends on where you live, but you can check on that here. In New York City, for example, moonrise will be at 6:13 pm tonight.

According to Jamie Carter at Forbes, here’s where to look:

Look east as the Sun sets in the west. In practice you won’t see the full Moon appear until about 10-15 minutes after the moonrise time because of atmospheric cloud low on the horizon and other obstructions.

What about those planets? Mars will be in the southeast sky, where it’ll be the brightest thing up there, after the moon. Next up: Saturn and Jupiter. “They’ll be the two bright dots dancing next to each other to the west,” Nicholas St. Fleur writes for the New York Times. “Jupiter will outshine its ringed cousin and be the brightest non-moon object on this half of the sky.” Plus, if you’re able to get up before sunrise on Sunday morning, you’ll also be able to see Venus and possibly Mercury below it.

And finally, there’s Uranus. You’re going to need a telescope for this one, and the planet will look like a small blue-green disc. Here’s where to find it, courtesy of Michele Debczak at Mental Floss:

Spotting Uranus at opposition will be slightly more difficult in 2020 than in years past. The phenomenon coincides with a full moon that will make dimmer stars and planets—including Uranus—harder to see in the night sky. The planet sits in the constellation Aries, which regrettably appears close to the moon for most of the night.

Fingers crossed for clear skies!

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How to Spot Tonights Halloween Blue Moon & A Few Planets, Too

Illustration for article titled How to Spot Tonights Halloween Blue Moon  A Few Planets, Too

Photo: Chockdee Permploysiri (Shutterstock)

This year, trick-or-treating probably doesn’t look like you thought it would, and Halloween parties are (hopefully, in the name of public health) cancelled, but there’s still something pretty spectacular going on tonight. Best of all, it’s free and you can probably see it from your own backyard (or fire escape). Not only is there a rare Blue Moon tonight, but there’s also the possibility of spotting Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus. Here’s where and when to find them.

Where and when to find the moon and planets

First things first: the moon will not actually be blue. But, for a brief period—as it rises above the eastern horizon—it will be orange, which is even more appropriate given the holiday. So when exactly will that happen? It depends on where you live, but you can check on that here. In New York City, for example, moonrise will be at 6:13 pm tonight.

According to Jamie Carter at Forbes, here’s where to look:

Look east as the Sun sets in the west. In practice you won’t see the full Moon appear until about 10-15 minutes after the moonrise time because of atmospheric cloud low on the horizon and other obstructions.

What about those planets? Mars will be in the southeast sky, where it’ll be the brightest thing up there, after the moon. Next up: Saturn and Jupiter. “They’ll be the two bright dots dancing next to each other to the west,” Nicholas St. Fleur writes for the New York Times. “Jupiter will outshine its ringed cousin and be the brightest non-moon object on this half of the sky.” Plus, if you’re able to get up before sunrise on Sunday morning, you’ll also be able to see Venus and possibly Mercury below it.

And finally, there’s Uranus. You’re going to need a telescope for this one, and the planet will look like a small blue-green disc. Here’s where to find it, courtesy of Michele Debczak at Mental Floss:

Spotting Uranus at opposition will be slightly more difficult in 2020 than in years past. The phenomenon coincides with a full moon that will make dimmer stars and planets—including Uranus—harder to see in the night sky. The planet sits in the constellation Aries, which regrettably appears close to the moon for most of the night.

Fingers crossed for clear skies!

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Four test positive for COVID-19 at FMH – Daily Bulldog

Franklin Memorial Hospital

FARMINGTON – Four Franklin Memorial Hospital staff members have tested positive for COVID-19 in what the Maine Center for Disease Control is classifying as an outbreak, according to a press release distributed Friday evening by the hospital.

All four employees, described as being members of the hospital’s care team that worked in different areas of the hospital, tested positive for the respiratory illness and are now in self-quarantine. Those cases are seen as an indication that the virus had “rooted itself” in Franklin County, FMH’s statement indicates.

“They worked in different areas of the hospital, and it is believed that the cases are an indication that the coronavirus has rooted itself in Franklin County,” the statement reads, “which up until now has had fewer cases than other, harder-hit parts of Maine. The CDC has classified the cases as an outbreak, however they are unlikely to be isolated or confined to the hospital as the coronavirus is increasingly showing up in Maine’s rural areas.”

Maine has seen a surge in positive cases over the past few days, with 103 additional cases reported Friday. The 7-day positivity rate, a function of positive cases compared to total test volume, has crept up to .83 percent. Over the course of the entire pandemic, Franklin County has seen only a fraction of the roughly 6,500 cases reported statewide, per the Maine CDC data, logging 80 positive cases. That state has recorded a single death of a Franklin County resident due to COVID-19, as well as 68 recoveries.

“What this means is that we are all going to have to step up our vigilance if we want to limit the spread of COVID-19 in our community,” said Trampas Hutches, president of Franklin Community Health Care, which includes Franklin Memorial. “We would urge everyone in the community to wear a face covering over their mouth and nose whenever they are in an indoor space with people who are not part of their immediate household. This should be the case even when people are more than six feet apart.”

FMH is working with the CDC to test everyone potentially exposed to the virus. The hospital is also reviewing related policies, such as where employees gather for breaks.

“The positive cases are not thought to pose a significant risk to patients as hospital staff has been consistent in the use of protective equipment shown to minimize transmission,” FMH’s said in its statement.

The hospital is also stressing that people continue to get flu shots and not put off care for other medical issues. FMH remains open for all services, with the statement indicating that “extensive protocols” were in place to keep patients safe, including universal masking, frequent cleanings and designated areas for treating potential COVID-19 patients.

In addition to wearing a mask, the CDC recommends people practice good hand hygiene and keep surfaces clean. Those who are concerned they may have been exposed to COVID-19 or experience symptoms of infection – including fever, chills, sore throat, difficulty breathing, unexplained muscle aches, new cough, loss of taste or smell, nasal congestion or vomiting or diarrhea – should call their primary care provider for advice on testing, treatment and quarantine measures.

“Up to this point, Maine has done much better than the rest of the country controlling the spread of this virus, and fortunately for our community, it hasn’t been as prevalent in Franklin County,” said Hutches. “With the cooler weather, every indication is that that is starting to change. It is vital that we take this threat seriously by wearing a mask and practicing social distancing.”

 

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Genetic testing can access your risk of getting cancer. Here are the costs involved – CNBC

Tara Kirk, pictured with her husband, found out she has a gene mutation that puts her at higher risk for several cancers.

Source: Tara Kirk

Tara Kirk was 6 years old when her mother died of lung cancer.

Almost three decades later, at the age of 34, Kirk found out she had a gene mutation that increases her risk of developing a number of diseases, most notably colon and endometrial cancers.

“I was in denial that I could have had it,” said Kirk, now 36 and living in Houston with her husband and son.

When people think of gene mutations, the breast cancer (BRCA) genes often come to mind. Actress Angelina Jolie famously laid out her decision to have a preventive double mastectomy after her BRCA1 diagnosis back in 2013.

The lifetime risk of breast cancer is increased by 20% to 49% for women with moderate-risk gene mutations and 50% or higher with those who have high-risk mutations, according to Susan G. Koman.

Angelina Jolie had a preventive double mastectomy in 2013, after discovering she had a BRCA mutation.

Samir Hussein | WireImage | Getty Images

In fact, researchers have associated mutations in specific genes with about 50 hereditary cancer syndromes, according to the National Cancer Institute.

For Kirk, it is the gene known as MSH6, one of several mutations that are classified as Lynch Syndrome.

While there was family history of cancer, she only got tested after her aunt was diagnosed with endometrial cancer. Kirk now believes her mother’s cancer may have started elsewhere before traveling to the lungs.

Since her diagnosis, Kirk goes for annual screenings, including a colonoscopy, endometrial biopsy, ultrasound, and full body skin exam. She gets an upper endoscopy every other year and was told when she reaches 40, she should have her uterus and ovaries removed.

Fortunately, Kirk has insurance. About $3,500 a year comes out of her paycheck to pay for her employer-sponsored insurance and she spends an additional $2,000 a year out-of-pocket for her surveillance. It’s a small price to pay for the chance to catch cancer early, she said.

“My very first colonoscopy they found a precancerous polyp, so knowledge saved my life,” Kirk said.

When to get testing done

Not everyone is a candidate for genetic testing. In fact, only about 5% to 10% of all cancers are considered hereditary, although it varies by the specific cancer.

About one in 400 women have a BRAC1 or BRAC2 mutation, although those of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage have a higher risk: one in 40. Lynch syndrome affects approximately one in 270 people and causes about 3% to 5% of colon cancers and 2% to 3% of uterine cancers.

Tara Kirk and her mom in December 1988.

Source: Tara Kirk

To determine if you have a gene mutation, first gather your family history and see your doctor, said Susan Brown, senior director of education and support at Susan G. Komen.

If your health-care provider thinks you might have a hereditary mutation, you’ll be referred to a genetic counselor, who may order a blood or saliva test.

“It’s an easy test,” Brown said. “The ramifications of the results can be a little more complicated.

“If you have a positive mutation, then you have to think about what you are going to do with that information.”

Testing costs anywhere from a couple hundred dollars to several thousand dollars and may be covered by insurance. The multigene panel is pricey, since it surveys a number of genes.

If someone in your family has already been diagnosed with a specific mutation, you can be tested for that mutation alone, which is a lot cheaper. For those who don’t have health insurance, many of the gene-testing companies have programs that bring the cost down to $250 to $300.

My very first colonoscopy they found a precancerous polyp, so knowledge saved my life.

Tara Kirk

Lynch Syndrome patient

Coverage of BRCA testing for women is required under the Affordable Care Act, although the fate of the law is uncertain. The U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear arguments on whether the ACA is constitutional after the election in November.

Coverage for other gene mutations is optional, but has grown in recent years, according to Lisa Schlager, vice president of public policy at the hereditary cancer advocacy organization Force, which stands for Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered.

“They do [cover testing] for the most part, but it can incur or involve out-of-pocket costs,” she said.

Then there are direct-to-consumer companies like 23andMe and Ancestry. Generally, direct-to-consumer tests are not part of recommended clinical practice, according to the National Cancer Institute.

“If they are not done through a doctor in an approved lab, there is potential for errors,” Komen’s Brown explained.

Some tests may only check for a few mutations.

“You may make a decision and have an understanding of your risk based on incomplete information,” she said.

More from Invest in You:
Yes, you can negotiate medical bills. Here’s how to lower your costs
Actor Chadwick Boseman died without a will. Why you should have a plan
The big lesson Suze Orman learned from her recent health scare

For $179, AncestryHealth offers testing for genetic risks and says it can detect 80% or more of known DNA differences linked to certain cancers.

“AncestryHealth includes laboratory tests developed and performed by an independent CLIA-certified laboratory partner, and with oversight from an independent clinician network of board-certified physicians and genetic counselors,” its website states.

Meanwhile, 23andMe’s Health + Ancestry service includes testing for selected variants of BRCA1 and BRCA2.

“23andMe standards for accuracy are incredibly high,” the company said in a statement. “Detailed analytical testing through the FDA review process showed that our Genetic Health Risk and Carrier Status reports meet accuracy thresholds of 99 percent or higher.”

Costs of screening

If you are found to have a so-called “cancer-gene,” you generally will start undergoing annual cancer screenings. You may also opt for preventive, or prophylactic, surgery — typically a mastectomy or hysterectomy.

The costs and amount of insurance coverage — if you have any — vary widely.

Heather Horton, 35, and her mother, 63-year-old Sue Williams, have had two vastly different experiences.

Heather Horton, L, and her mother, Sue Williams both have a gene mutation that is associated with a higher risk of several cancers, including colon.

Source: Sue Williams

The pair, who live in Portland, Oregon, both have the MLH1 mutation, another gene that falls under Lynch Syndrome.

Williams found out at the age of 54, after her brother was diagnosed with colon cancer in his 40s. She’s had no issue with her coverage. She had a preventative hysterectomy and now undergoes regular colonoscopies and endoscopies, which cost her $20 after insurance. She pays $812 a month for her policy.

Horton, on the other hand, has become an expert at reading medical bills and understanding coding after spending a lot of time challenging charges.

Diagnosed at 28 years old, Horton gets the same screenings as her mom, plus ultrasounds, a blood test and an endometrial biopsy to monitor her uterus and ovaries. Over the years, her annual screening costs have run from about $800 to $2,500, with around $1,500 being the norm. Her monthly premium is about $520 for a family plan.

“One of the biggest challenges is [that] it’s hard to really track or budget for, because I can’t ever really estimate what the expenses are going to be,” Horton said.

Fighting to bring down costs

Health insurers aren’t required to cover cancer screenings, beyond what is mandated by the ACA, which is focused on the “average risk” population. That leads many to struggle to get coverage for earlier, more intensive screenings and risk-reducing surgeries, according to Force.

While insurance typically covers the surveillance, those who have high-deductible plans may still wind up with a hefty bill, said Force’s Schlager.

“We are testing people but not empowering them with easy access, necessarily, to the follow-up care,” she said.

Medicare doesn’t cover preventive care, unless authorized by Congress. Right now, those over 50 years old can get screening colonoscopies covered and those over 40 can get screening mammograms — as well as a baseline between the ages of 35-39. However, anyone younger on Medicare, such as those with disabilities, won’t be covered.

Medicare also doesn’t cover breast MRIs, which doctors recommend for those with a high breast cancer risk, as well as preventive surgeries, Schlager said.

Our whole health system is focused on treatment. If we were to flip that and focus on prevention, we would probably save the system a lot of money long-term.

Lisa Schlager

vice president of public policy at Force

She’s currently working on legislation with Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, and Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Florida, to amend the Medicare statute to broaden the preventive cancer screenings.

Medicaid coverage for screenings is more difficult to track, since it varies by state. All but three state programs cover BRCA testing and most cover testing for Lynch Syndrome. Less than a handful cover multigene panel testing, Schlager said. She recommends checking with your state’s Medicaid office to find out what’s available.

“Our whole health system is focused on treatment,” Schlager said.

“If we were to flip that and focus on prevention, we would probably save the system a lot of money long-term. But we are just not there yet.”

‘Managing your destiny’

While there may be costs with cancer screenings, it is better than the alternative: not catching cancer early and paying for costly treatments.

“It is really managing your destiny as far as your health,” said Susan Dallas, executive director of Lynch Syndrome International.

Her father passed away from pancreatic cancer when she was four years old. At 43, Dallas was diagnosed with colon cancer, and subsequently, Lynch Syndrome, which includes genes MLHL, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, and EPCAM.

“If you don’t know what you are dealing with, you can’t possibly know what your potential cost could be down the road,” Dallas said.

“It could save you thousands and thousands of dollars, not to mention the heartache, stress and loss of income because you end up with cancer.”

In fact, a new report from the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network titled “The Costs of Cancer” found that U.S. cancer patients spent $5.6 billion in out-of-pocket costs for cancer treatment in 2018. Those with ACA-compliant coverage paid between $5,000 out-of-pocket in a large employer plan to over $12,000 in an individual marketplace plan. Short-term limited duration plan patients paid $52,000.

Despite the frustrations she has encountered, Horton doesn’t regret getting tested.

“Knowledge is power. We do have some of this within our control to stay on top of it,” she said.

“There is some comfort in that, than just kind of waiting for some symptom to appear.”

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