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Is it a cold or COVID-19? Symptoms to look out for – Fox News

The risk of catching COVID-19 sent many in search of tests at the first signs of a common cold over the past year, and now as the nation gradually reopens there is an increased chance you will come into contact with someone carrying a summer cold. So how can you tell if it’s a case of the sniffles or something more? 

Dr. LeRoy Essig, a pulmonary disease doctor at OhioHealth Physician Group in Columbus, broke down the origins of a summer cold and a few key ways that it differentiates from COVID-19. 

“A summer cold is the same as a winter cold,” he said, adding that while it’s more common in the winter rhinoviruses and coronaviruses are still present in the summer so it’s possible to come down with one. 

CDC WARNS ON UPTICK IN RSV CASES AFTER LOW ACTIVITY DURING COVID-19: WHAT TO KNOW

Colds are also transmitted through droplets when someone coughs or sneezes, but it’s also possible to contract one through touching contaminated surfaces and then touching your own ear, nose or mouth. 

Symptoms are typically the same as a common winter cold and include sore throat, cough, runny nose, and sometimes fatigue, body aches or the occasional fever, several of which overlap with COVID-19. The symptoms of both colds and COVID-19 run a similar course of about one-to-two weeks which could also make it difficult to differentiate between the two. 

But there are several symptoms that are more commonly seen with one or the other that can help keep your worries at bay. 

DROP IN ROUTINE CHILDHOOD VACCINATIONS DURING CORONAVIRUS MAY SPUR INCREASE IN PREVENTABLE ILLNESSES, CDC WARNS

Loss of taste or smell for instance, is more common with COVID-19, especially if it occurs in the absence of congestion, Essig said. Bowel symptoms like diarrhea are also more so a sign of COVID-19 than a summer cold, as is shortness of breath which could be a sign of worsening COVID-19. 

“There are two important things to consider,” Essig said. “One, if you get sick and you’ve been around someone you know had COVID-19, that increases the likelihood that what you’ve got is COVID-19. But, it’s helpful if you got sick and are already fully vaccinated against COVID-19, it makes it much less likely that it is COVID-19 – it’s not impossible but it’s much less likely.” 

If you have been around someone, and you start suffering from some symptoms of your own, Essig recommends calling a physician or seeking out a COVID-19 test to confirm or rule out a diagnosis. 

CLICK HERE FOR COMPLETE CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

And while the CDC has already sent out an advisory regarding an uptick in RSV cases, some are speculating there could be in an increase in colds as well, but Essig said it’s hard to predict because “nobody really knows for sure.”

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Britains longest-hospitalized COVID patient dies – New York Post

Britain’s longest COVID-19 patient has died, after spending more than a year in hospital.

Jason Kelk, 49, who suffered from asthma and diabetes, died at hospice in Leeds, surrounded by family after deciding he could not “live like this anymore.” He had asked his doctors to cease all treatment after spending more than 14 months in a hospital.

Kelk was admitted to St. James Hospital March 31, 2020, and was hooked up to a ventilator and transferred to an intensive care unit soon after he arrived.

The virus ravaged his lungs and kidneys, according to a report. Kelk also developed acute stomach ailments and had to be fed intravenously.

In March, after surviving two weeks without a ventilator, there was hope Kelk could return home. Kelk said he looked forward to sitting on the sofa with his wife Sue to watch television and eat fish and chips.

This incredible video shows the “miraculous” moment a 49-year-old man thought to be one of the UK’s longest-fighting Covid patients walked for the first time since last MARCH.
Jason Kelk had asked his doctors to cease all treatment after spending more than 14 months in a hospital.
Sue Kelk / SWNS

But his condition had deteriorated by May.

“He just wanted it all to come to an end,” said his wife Sue Kelk. “The antibiotics had worked but his spirit had gone. I think really Jason from February 2020 disappeared. That’s the Jason we knew. But the Jason everybody loved was still very much there.”

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Sen. Rand Paul: In all likelihood COVID escaped from a Wuhan lab – Fox News

Sen. Rand Paul slammed Dr. Anthony Fauci Saturday on “Unfiltered” for a possible “conflict of interest” related to the theory that COVID escaped from a Wuhan lab, and said the NIAID director was continuing to make scientific mistakes related to the virus.

SEN. RAND PAUL: When you look at COVID-19, it doesn’t even seem to infect bats very well. It doesn’t infect an intermediate animal. They checked 80,000 animals at the wet markets in Wuhan. None of the animals at the wet market would accept COVID-19 or were positive for it. But it looks like it’s most well-adapted for humans. So this is worrisome, and yet more evidence that this, in all likelihood, came from the lab. 

I think if you look back at the last year and you look at the people who are discounting the theory that it originated in a lab, they are precisely the same scientists that it originated in a lab. So, there is a real possibility that they have a conflict of interest. 

This may be the biggest scientific error that Dr. Fauci has made so far and continues to make. He’s completely discounting natural immunity – the immunity you get after you’ve had an infection. All of the scientific studies, and I emphasize that ‘all,’ hundreds of studies now show that you do have immunity. But if you discount that and you don’t count it, then Dr. Fauci says ‘Oh no, we don’t have enough people vaccinated, we’re not at herd immunity.’ Now we have to have mandates on the children, and we must force children of all ages to have the vaccine even though they don’t get sick from COVID very often and they almost never die from it. He wants to force the vaccine on them because he makes a scientific error and doesn’t count natural immunity. 

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Why India Is Dealing With a Deadly Black Fungus Epidemic – The New York Times

AHMEDABAD, India — In the stifling, tightly packed medical ward at Civil Hospital, the ear, nose and throat specialist moved briskly from one bed to the next, shining a flashlight into one patient’s mouth, examining another’s X-rays.

The specialist, Dr. Bela Prajapati, oversees treatment for nearly 400 patients with mucormycosis, a rare and often deadly fungal disease that has exploded across India on the coattails of the coronavirus pandemic. Unprepared for this spring’s devastating Covid-19 second wave, many of India’s hospitals took desperate steps to save lives — steps that may have opened the door to yet another deadly disease.

“The pandemic has precipitated an epidemic,” Dr. Prajapati said.

In three weeks, the number of cases of the disease — known by the misnomer “black fungus,” because it is found on dead tissue — shot up to more than 30,000 from negligible levels. States have recorded more than 2,100 deaths, according to news reports. The federal health ministry in New Delhi, which is tracking nationwide cases to allot scarce and expensive antifungal medicine, has not released a fatalities figure.

The coronavirus pandemic has drawn stark lines between rich nations and poor, and the mucormycosis epidemic in India stands as the latest manifestation. During the second wave, which struck India in April, its creaky, underfunded medical system lacked beds, oxygen and other necessities as infections and deaths soared.

The mucormycosis epidemic adds even more urgency to the difficult task of protecting India’s 1.4 billion people. Only a small fraction have been vaccinated against the coronavirus, and they remain vulnerable to a third wave and the consequences that could follow.

“Mucormycosis will tail off and go back to baseline as the Covid cases subside,” said Dr. Dileep Mavalankar, an epidemiologist. “But it may come back in the third wave unless we find out why it is happening.”

Many doctors in India think they know why. The bone-and-tissue-eating fungus can attack the gastrointestinal tract, the lungs, the skin and the sinuses, where it often spreads to the eye socket and the brain if left untreated. Treatment for the disease involves complex, often disfiguring surgery and an uncommon and expensive drug, contributing to a mortality rate above 50 percent.

Mucormycosis is not passed from person to person. It develops from commonplace spores that sometimes build up in homes and hospitals. Doctors believe India’s crowded hospitals, and their dire lack of medical oxygen, left the fungus an opening.

Without enough oxygen to go around, doctors in many places injected patients with steroids, a standard treatment for doctors battling Covid globally. They can reduce inflammation in the lungs and help Covid patients breathe more easily.

Many doctors prescribed steroids in quantities and for durations that far exceed World Health Organization recommendations, said Arunaloke Chakrabarti, a microbiologist and the co-author of a study examining the causes of India’s mucormycosis outbreak. Those steroids may have compromised patient immune systems and made Covid-19 patients more susceptible to fungal spores.

The steroids may have also dangerously increased blood sugar levels, leaving people with diabetes vulnerable to mucormycosis. It could also increase the chance of blood clots, leading to malnourished tissue, which the “fungus attacks,” Dr. Prajapati said.

Desperate doctors may not have had the chance to ask patients about whether they had diabetes or other conditions before resorting to steroids.

“Doctors hardly had any time to do patient management,” Dr. Chakrabarti said. “They were all looking at how to take care of the respiratory tract.”

According to the health ministry, about four out of five mucormycosis patients have had Covid-19. More than half have diabetes.

Alok Kumar Chaudry, a 30-year-old engineer with surgical tape over his left eye and hooked up to an I.V. drip at Civil Hospital, is one of those with mucormycosis who first came down with Covid.

He was studying for India’s civil service exam in April in New Delhi when the second wave hit. After testing positive for the coronavirus, and with hospital beds, drugs and oxygen scarce, he jumped onto a train to his older brother’s home in rural Gujarat. There, his oxygen levels plummeted to a potentially lethal 54 percent.

After two weeks on oxygen support and steroids at a local hospital, he recovered from Covid-19 but developed an acute headache on the left side of his brain. Doctors thought that steroids may have caused it and that it would go away.

“Suddenly vision in my left eye went blank,” Mr. Chaudry said.

An M.R.I. showed mucormycosis. The doctors said they would have to remove his eye.

He went to Ahmedabad’s Civil Hospital for a second opinion. Five specialists oversaw a surgery that involved scraping away the dead tissue in his sinus tract. To clear out remaining infection, he received a 15-day course of amphotericin B, an antifungal medication.

Dr. Chakrabarti said that if Mr. Chaudry kept his eye, he could still lose his life, since surgeons couldn’t remove the thin layer of infection behind his eye without removing the eye itself.

“I’ve lost vision in my left eye, my studies have suffered,” Mr. Chaudry said. “Definitely I want to know why mucor has formed. If it’s faulty treatment, then someone is responsible. If it’s the wrath of God, what can I do?”

The study that Dr. Chakrabarti co-authored, published this month by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said that heavy use of steroids, the correlation with diabetes and the unsanitary conditions at some hospitals had played a role.

Even before the pandemic, India recorded about 50 mucormycosis cases a year, compared with, on average, a single case every two years in the United States and Western Europe. Environmental conditions play a part, as does the incidence of diabetes — India has more than twice as many people with the condition as the United States does.

Usually in India, mucormycosis afflicts people with diabetes who are either unaware of their condition or who are not taking insulin properly. But in the current outbreak, many patients had no history of diabetes. The common denominator was a Covid-19 infection treated with steroids, clinicians and researchers say.

The government in Ahmedabad, in Gujarat, declared mucormycosis an epidemic in May. Other states have followed. Whether patients live or die often depends on how quickly they undergo debridement surgery that removes the fungus and then start a two-week course of amphotericin B.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who is from Gujarat, described the fungal disease as a new “challenge” and said it was “important to create systems to tackle it.”

India makes small supplies of amphotericin B, which can be obtained free of charge at some public hospitals. But because supplies are limited, India is importing it from the United States, where it costs about $300 per vial. Each patient needs 60 to 100 vials. Gilead Sciences, the American manufacturer, has donated about 200,000 vials.

Doctors are using cheaper drugs that are as effective but more toxic, posing a risk of kidney damage.

“That’s a very painful choice,” said Dr. Atul Patel, an infectious diseases specialist at the private Sterling Hospital in Ahmedabad who has treated dozens of mucormycosis patients in the outbreak.

Dr. Patel, another of the study’s authors, said that steroids, which in India are commonly prescribed for routine ailments such as diarrhea or fever, had been prescribed to Covid-19 patients with mild infections who didn’t need them.

That was the case for one of Dr. Patel’s patients, Ambaben Heerabhai Patel, 60, the matriarch of a farming family in rural Gujarat, who is paying about $700 a day for antifungal treatment and other services at Sterling.

It’s a steep cost, but Ms. Patel had seen Dr. Patel — no relation — for previous health issues related to her diabetes. After back-to-back infections of Covid-19 and then mucormycosis, she did not want to take any chances.

Arriving at the hospital May 17 with an intense headache and facial numbness, Ms. Patel said in early June from her private room at Sterling Hospital that she felt well for the first time in more than a month.

Of Dr. Patel, she said, “he’s like my god.”

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The miracle DIY jab that offers end to back pain agony for more than 200,000 Britons – Daily Mail

People with a severe back-pain condition are set to be given a new drug that can halt the disease in its tracks and protect them from permanent spine damage.

Until now, the powerful treatment – a self-administered injection – has been reserved for those with the most advanced disease. But from this week the NHS will get the green light to offer the DIY jabs to those in the early stages.

The drug, secukinumab, is designed to treat spondyloarthritis, an umbrella term for a number of conditions in which the immune system, for unknown reasons, turns inwards and attacks healthy spinal joints.

The drug, secukinumab, is designed to treat spondyloarthritis, an umbrella term for a number of conditions in which the immune system, for unknown reasons, turns inwards and attacks healthy spinal joints

The drug, secukinumab, is designed to treat spondyloarthritis, an umbrella term for a number of conditions in which the immune system, for unknown reasons, turns inwards and attacks healthy spinal joints

The drug, secukinumab, is designed to treat spondyloarthritis, an umbrella term for a number of conditions in which the immune system, for unknown reasons, turns inwards and attacks healthy spinal joints

In both types, the main symptom is back pain and stiffness that gets worse after inactivity and eases after exercise. Patients often suffer more at night, leading to difficulty sleeping, and stiffness in the morning. Eye and bowel problems and fatigue are further symptoms

In both types, the main symptom is back pain and stiffness that gets worse after inactivity and eases after exercise. Patients often suffer more at night, leading to difficulty sleeping, and stiffness in the morning. Eye and bowel problems and fatigue are further symptoms

In both types, the main symptom is back pain and stiffness that gets worse after inactivity and eases after exercise. Patients often suffer more at night, leading to difficulty sleeping, and stiffness in the morning. Eye and bowel problems and fatigue are further symptoms

Secukinumab comes in pre-filled, single-dose injector ¿pens¿. Each pen costs about £600 privately, so if a patient were to pay for the treatment themselves, it would cost roughly £10,000 in the first year, and £7,200 a year subsequently

Secukinumab comes in pre-filled, single-dose injector ¿pens¿. Each pen costs about £600 privately, so if a patient were to pay for the treatment themselves, it would cost roughly £10,000 in the first year, and £7,200 a year subsequently

Secukinumab comes in pre-filled, single-dose injector ‘pens’. Each pen costs about £600 privately, so if a patient were to pay for the treatment themselves, it would cost roughly £10,000 in the first year, and £7,200 a year subsequently

This leads to inflammation, stiffness and pain and, in the long term, damage to the spine itself.

The condition has two main sub-types: non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis, in which there is no damage to the spine visible on X-rays, and ankylosing spondylitis, in which the damage can be seen.

In both types, the main symptom is back pain and stiffness that gets worse after inactivity and eases after exercise. Patients often suffer more at night, leading to difficulty sleeping, and stiffness in the morning. Eye and bowel problems and fatigue are further symptoms.

More than 200,000 Britons are affected by these conditions and most start to experience problems in their 20s.

Historically, spondyloarthritis was difficult to detect before damage was visible on X-rays, and there is currently an average eight-year delay in diagnosis from the first onset of symptoms.

Advances in scanning techniques and testing mean spondyloarthritis is now possible to spot at an earlier stage. However, many patients delay seeking help, as back pain is such a common complaint. Pain in the buttocks area is often initially misdiagnosed as sciatica, a condition caused by compressed nerves in the lower back. In about half of cases, non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis progresses to ankylosing spondylitis.

Secukinumab, also known by the brand name Cosentyx, is already given to patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis.

Studies showed that 45 per cent of patients on secukinumab saw a significant improvement in symptoms, including reduced pain and stiffness, after 16 weeks of treatment. Now, prescribing watchdog the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has approved secukinumab for use in those with non radiographic axial spondyloarthritis.

The drug, known as a biologic therapy, works by interfering with proteins produced by the immune system that cause inflammation. This leads to long-term relief. Consultant rheumatologist Dr Raj Sengupta, at the Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases in Bath, said: ‘We know that the pain and suffering experienced by patients with the earlier-stage, non-radiographic form of the disease can be just as severe as those in the later stages.

Studies showed that 45 per cent of patients on secukinumab saw a significant improvement in symptoms, including reduced pain and stiffness, after 16 weeks of treatment

Studies showed that 45 per cent of patients on secukinumab saw a significant improvement in symptoms, including reduced pain and stiffness, after 16 weeks of treatment

Studies showed that 45 per cent of patients on secukinumab saw a significant improvement in symptoms, including reduced pain and stiffness, after 16 weeks of treatment

‘The hope is that if we can get the treatment to the right patients earlier, the response rate will be better and we’ll have more chance of slowing down irreversible spine damage.’

He added: ‘These are horrible, disabling conditions, and secukinumab gives patients their quality of life back. Many of them call it a “miracle” drug.’

Dr Sengupta is backing a new campaign by the National Axial Spondyloarthritis Society aimed at reducing time to diagnosis to one year. He says: ‘If patients and GPs reading this recognise the characteristic symptoms – back pain and stiffness that’s worse with rest and better after activity, waking with pain at night, and stiffness in the morning – they should seek a referral to a rheumatologist straight away so we can carry out tests.’

Spondyloarthritis is thought to be caused by a problem with the immune system. Treatment involves an injection once a week for five weeks, followed by a single jab once a month from then on.

Secukinumab comes in pre-filled, single-dose injector ‘pens’. Each pen costs about £600 privately, so if a patient were to pay for the treatment themselves, it would cost roughly £10,000 in the first year, and £7,200 a year subsequently.

But NICE negotiates special ‘bulk discount’ deals, meaning that the NHS would be expected to pay far less than this.

One patient who has already seen the benefits of the treatment is 42-year-old businesswoman Clair McGrath. She had suffered life-ruining back pain for 12 years before being diagnosed with non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis in 2016.

Clair says: ‘I started getting pains in my lower back when I was about 25, after the birth of my daughter. Initially, the doctor thought it was related to the pregnancy and I was told it would go away. But it didn’t. The pain was particularly bad at night – so much so that sometimes I slept on the floor.’

Eventually, suffering extreme fatigue and a pain in her pelvis, Clair returned to her GP and was referred to a rheumatologist, who diagnosed her. She was put on secukinumab a year later, and the transformation has been remarkable.

‘The main change for me is that the fatigue is gone,’ she says. ‘I feel sharper and have more stamina. I’ve been able to take up swimming.

‘When I first started to take it, I thought, “This must be what being normal feels like.” I’d forgotten, as I’d been ill for so long.’

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Delta variant of COVID-19 detected in Indiana – WTHR

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Cuba encouraged by early efficacy results of homegrown COVID-19 vaccine – Reuters

A nurse shows a dose of the Soberana-02 COVID-19 vaccine to be used in a volunteer as part of Phase III trials of the experimental Cuban vaccine candidate, amid concerns about the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Havana, Cuba, March 31, 2021. Jorge Luis Banos/Pool via REUTERS

HAVANA, June 19 (Reuters) – Cuba’s Soberana 2 vaccine candidate has shown 62% efficacy with just two of its three doses, state-run biopharmaceutical corporation BioCubaFarma said on Saturday, citing preliminary data from late phase trials.

Cuba, whose biotech sector has exported vaccines for decades, has five vaccine candidates in clinical trials, of which two – Soberana 2 and Abdala – are in late phase trials.

“In a few weeks we should have the results for the efficacy with three doses which we expect will be superior,” said Vicente Vérez​, director of the state-run Finlay Vaccine Institute, which developed Soberana 2.

The news comes as the Caribbean’s largest island is facing its worst outbreak since the start of the pandemic in the wake of the arrival of more contagious variants, setting new records of daily coronavirus cases.

The Communist-run country has opted not to import foreign vaccines but rather to rely on its own. Experts say it is a risky bet but if it pays off, Cuba could burnish its scientific reputation, generate much-needed hard currency through exports and strengthen the vaccination drive worldwide.

“We know our government has not been able to provide this project all the funding it required, and nonetheless this is a result of global standing,” President Miguel Diaz-Canel said at the presentation of the results on state-run television.

Several countries from Argentina and Jamaica to Mexico and Venezuela have expressed an interest in buying Cuba’s vaccines. Iran started producing Soberana 2 earlier this year as part of late-phase clinical trials.

Cuba’s authorities have started administering the experimental vaccines en masse as part of “intervention studies” they hope will slow the spread of the virus.

Daily cases have halved in the capital since the start of this vaccination campaign, according to official data, although that may also be due to stricter lockdown measures.

Reporting by Anett Rios
Writing by Sarah Marsh; Editing by David Gregorio

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Sweating a Ton Doesnt Mean You Got a Good Workout

man sweating after a workout

Photo: Flamingo Images (Shutterstock)

Let me introduce you to your good friend, sweat. Ignore the gross feel and the potential for B.O. for the moment, and think about what it does for you: When your body gets too hot, threatening to raise your core temperature over what’s healthy, little glands in your skin squeeze drops of moisture onto its surface. As soon as a breeze hits those droplets, they evaporate, taking some of your body heat away with them.

Pretty cool, huh? So let’s look at what it means to sweat while you’re working out:

  • You are hot
  • Your body wants to cool you down
  • That is it. I promise.

Seems too simple? Let’s look at the scenarios where you sweat. On a hot day, while you’re lounging around? Check. Indoors in the air conditioning, when you’re doing a workout? Also check. Exercise raises your body temperature (muscles generate heat as they work), so you’ll feel warm and you’ll start to sweat. It’s not the exercise itself that makes you sweat, it’s the heat.

You can get a great workout even if you don’t sweat very much

At the same ambient temperature, a harder workout might result in more body heat, so we’ve built up an association between sweating and working hard. It’s deceptive, though.

If you go for a 10-mile run in the heat, you’ll sweat buckets. Ten miles on a treadmill at room temperature, and you may not sweat quite as much, but you’ll still be dripping. Go and run 10 miles in the winter, though, and you’ll barely be damp. That’s because your body doesn’t have to worry about cooling itself down.

Why do some people sweat more than others?

One of biggest differences between people who sweat a lot and those who sweat less is body size. It doesn’t matter whether you’re fat, muscular, tall, or some combination thereof; the more of you there is, the harder your skin has to work to cool you down, and thus the more you sweat. When compared to average-sized or larger adults, children and petite folks have more surface area (skin) compared to the amount of body mass that needs cooling. In other words, they have a higher surface-area-to-volume ratio, so they can cool down with less sweat. It’s just physics.

If you lose a substantial amount of weight, you may end up sweating (slightly) less for this reason. On the flip side, the fitter you are, the more you might sweat, as research suggests runners’ bodies turn on the sweat glands sooner than sedentary people, and that they sweat more during the same workout.

Finally, if you feel like you’re the biggest sweater in your friend group, look at whether you’re actually doing appropriate comparisons. If you’re dripping when you run in the noonday sun and you see your friend post a selfie from the air-conditioned gym, you shouldn’t expect the two of you to sweat the same amount.

What’s the connection between sweat and weight loss?

Sweating a lot during a workout does not mean you’re losing fat, so let’s bust that myth right there. Sweating a lot can make you lose water weight, though, which is only temporary.

Our bodies contain a certain amount of water in our blood and in the various cells and compartments we’re made of. We can lose a little bit of it, become slightly dehydrated, and barely notice. Or we can drink a ton of water and become very hydrated, and have to pee a lot to get back to a normal level. In extreme cases, we can get so dehydrated it threatens our health, but that’s rare with normal activities.

When you sweat, and that sweat evaporates or gets rubbed off (you mop your brow with a towel, let’s say), that’s water leaving your body. You can actually weigh yourself before and after a workout and notice a change in weight if you sweat enough. Every pound of weight you lose is two cups (16 ounces) of water that has left your body. So technically you “lost weight,” but it wasn’t fat. You’re just due to drink two cups of water, and then you’ll be hydrated and happy again.

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Half of Unvaccinated People in US Have This in Common, Survey Says – Best Life

Vaccinations against COVID in the U.S. started rolling out in December to a select group of people, but now, anyone over the age of 12 can get vaccinated. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 53 percent of the total U.S. population has gotten at least one dose of a COVID vaccine. But, whether it’s due to concern about the speed at which they were developed, religious reasons, or political ones, many people have chosen not to get vaccinated. Now, a new survey says half of people who haven’t gotten their COVID shot have something in common.

RELATED: Half of People Hospitalized for COVID Have This in Common, New Study Says.

A team from the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research conducted online and telephone interviews with 1,125 U.S. adults. The researchers found that out of those who are not yet vaccinated, nearly half will never get their COVID shots. According to the poll, 46 percent of unvaccinated individuals say they will “definitely not get a vaccine,” while 29 percent say they will probably not get vaccinated. Of those who definitely won’t get vaccinated, 75 percent say they have “little or no worries” about COVID infection.

But data shows there may be cause for concern. A recent study found that unvaccinated people have been much more likely to be hospitalized for COVID in 2021. The study, which was conducted by the Cleveland Clinic, found that 99 percent of patients hospitalized with COVID during the first four months of the year were not fully vaccinated.

Since the CDC changed its guidance on masking in mid-May, allowing fully vaccinated people to go indoors without face coverings, many businesses have relied on the honor system, creating the potential for some unvaccinated individuals or those who have only received one shot to potentially ditch their masks too. A study on the subject, published in March 2021 in the journal Social Science & Medicine before the CDC changed its recommendations, found that 26 percent of unvaccinated respondents did not plan to wear a mask indoors.

“If you are vaccinated, you are protected,” CDC director Rochelle Walensky, MD, said during a White House news briefing in May. “If you are not vaccinated, our guidance has not changed for you. You remain at risk of infection. You still need to mask and take other precautions.”

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The AP-NORC poll results also showed that only 7 percent of those who have not been vaccinated say they will definitely get a COVID vaccine at some point, and 15 percent say they probably will. That group is one doctors and public health experts have been trying to reach. Another recent survey from the Kaiser Family Foundation, which was published at the end of May, revealed that 44 percent of unvaccinated people in the U.S. in the “wait and see” group would be more likely to get a COVID shot if the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) fully approved the vaccine.

The FDA granted the Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson vaccines emergency use authorization (EUA) at the end of 2020 and beginning of 2021. Both Pfizer and Moderna have since filed for full approval from the FDA, which requires at least six month’s worth of data on the vaccines’ safety and efficacy. As the first vaccine granted EUA, Pfizer submitted its application to the FDA for full approval at the beginning of May, and Moderna followed a month later. According to The New York Times, the process to approve these applications could take months.

However, experts note that the longer people wait to get vaccinated, the more opportunity there is for the virus to mutate and spread. This week, for example, the CDC named the delta variant, B.1.617.2., as a variant of concern, noting “there is evidence that this variant spreads easily from person to person.” On the heels of the announcement, Walensky once again urged the public to get vaccinated, saying “vaccination is our ticket OUT of this pandemic.”

RELATED: The CDC Says Vaccinated People Who Get COVID Have This in Common.

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Nearly 52% of Utahns ages 12+ fully vaccinated against COVID-19 – Salt Lake Tribune

The Utah Department of Health also reports two additional deaths in Salt Lake County and Iron County.

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Melanie Wolcott vaccinates Latasha Roddan on the last day the Salt Lake County Health Department’s COVID-19 vaccine operation was open at the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City, Saturday, May 29, 2021.

Editor’s note: The Salt Lake Tribune is providing free access to critical stories about the coronavirus. Sign up for our Top Stories newsletter, sent to your inbox every weekday morning. To support journalism like this, please donate or become a subscriber.

The Utah Department of Health reports that almost 52% of Utahns ages 12 and up are fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

With nearly 42% of the state fully vaccinated overall, the department reported 7,019 more vaccines were administered since June 18′s count, with 290 new cases of the virus reported since Friday.

Vaccine doses administered in past day/total doses administered • 7,019 / 2,782,173.

Utahns fully vaccinated • 1,340,119.

Cases reported in past day • 290.

Deaths reported in past day • Two, a Salt Lake County man in between the ages of 25-44, and an Iron County man between the ages of 45-64.

Tests reported in past day • 3,186 people were tested for the first time. A total of 5,618 tests people were tested.

Hospitalizations reported in the past day • 168. That’s two fewer than on Friday. Of those currently hospitalized, 69 are in intensive care, three more than on Friday.

Percentage of positive tests • Under the state’s original method, the rate is 9.2%. That’s higher than the seven-day average of 7.8%.

The state’s new method counts all test results, including repeated tests of the same individual. Saturday’s rate was 5.2%, slightly higher than the seven-day average of 5.0%

[Read more: Utah is changing how it measures the rate of positive COVID-19 tests. Here’s what that means.]

Totals to date • 411,361 cases; 2,328 deaths; 17,259 hospitalizations; 2,758,512 people tested.

This story is developing and will be updated.